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  1. #1
    rainshadow is offline Junior Member
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    Can someone just have me arrested?

    What is the name of your state? Tennessee

    I received a voice mail last week from a detective in a nearby County. He stated that he needed to speak with me regarding a theft and "had enough for an arrest warrant". I called him today thinking this was an issue of mistaken identity. He stated that a girl I was recently involved with for a short time reported that I broke into her home and took a ring belonging to her. He states that the only other things taken were clothing that belonged to me, i.e. clothing I had left at her residence. When I stated that I knew nothing about the issue and had not spoken to this girl in a few months, he responded with, "look we just want to get the ring back, you can keep your clothes." I was offended by his assumptious tone, and told him obviously this girl (who had some anger managment issues) had made this allegation up and I did not wish to discuss the matter with him, and if he felt he had information which indicates I should be arrested, to do as he felt he needed too, but I was not going to be treated like a theif over the phone when I am a law abiding citizen, told him to have a good day and hung up. He called back a few minutes later and stated he was going to have an arrest warrant for me did I want to turn myself in or be picked up? I was angered greatly by this, so I responded that I had never broke into anyone's home and I wasn't turning myself in for anything, to do what he felt he needed to do and again hung up.

    Can someone just say you did something and the police will arrest you? I mean, I left a 27 flat screen TV and a playstation 2 at her residence because I knew her son enjoyed them and prior to me bringing the my TV to her residence they had only a 13 inch TV. I told her she could just keep them. Why would I break in and get clothing and whatever ring she has, (she was never married, so I don't think she owned any diamonds or anything) and just leave approx 500-600 dollars in electronic equipment? Oh well, I am just venting now! How should I proceed on this?

    Thanks in advance for any responses.

    Chris Clark
    Last edited by rainshadow; 03-01-2005 at 04:01 PM.
  2. #2
    smutlydog is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainshadow
    What is the name of your state? Tennessee

    I received a voice mail last week from a detective in a nearby County. He stated that he needed to speak with me regarding a theft and "had enough for an arrest warrant". I called him today thinking this was an issue of mistaken identity. He stated that a girl I was recently involved with for a short time reported that I broke into her home and took a ring belonging to her. He states that the only other things taken were clothing that belonged to me, i.e. clothing I had left at her residence. When I stated that I knew nothing about the issue and had not spoken to this girl in a few months, he responded with, "look we just want to get the ring back, you can keep your clothes." I was offended by his assumptious tone, and told him obviously this girl (who had some anger managment issues) had made this allegation up and I did not wish to discuss the matter with him, and if he felt he had information which indicates I should be arrested, to do as he felt he needed too, but I was not going to be treated like a theif over the phone when I am a law abiding citizen, told him to have a good day and hung up. He called back a few minutes later and stated he was going to have an arrest warrant for me did I want to turn myself in or be picked up? I was angered greatly by this, so I responded that I had never broke into anyone's home and I wasn't turning myself in for anything, to do what he felt he needed to do and again hung up.

    Can someone just say you did something and the police will arrest you? I mean, I left a 27 flat screen TV and a playstation 2 at her residence because I knew her son enjoyed them and prior to me bringing the my TV to her residence they had only a 13 inch TV. I told her she could just keep them. Why would I break in and get clothing and whatever ring she has, (she was never married, so I don't think she owned any diamonds or anything) and just leave approx 500-600 dollars in electronic equipment? Oh well, I am just venting now! How should I proceed on this?

    Thanks in advance for any responses.

    Chris Clark
    It's perfectly legal for police officers to be deceptive during an interrogation.

    Q. Can someone just say you did something and the police will arrest you?
    A. Generally speaking No
  3. #3
    CdwJava is offline Senior Member
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    It could be that the officer was bluffing to try and get you to cough up the ring. Or, he could have something more than just her word. Maybe a neighbor alleges to have seen you at about the time the things were removed.

    Though it WOULD be suspicious that your clothing was the only other thing taken. Her word, combined with other circumstances and/or witnesses, could well be sufficient for an arrest warrant. The probable cause necessary for an arrest is much lower than that needed for a conviction.

    Do you know anything about the missing ring?

    - Carl
    A Nor Cal Cop Sergeant

    "Make mine a double mocha ...
    And a croissant!"

    Seek justice,
    Love mercy,
    Walk humbly with your God

    -- Courageous, by Casting Crowns ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkM-gDcmJeM
  4. #4
    rainshadow is offline Junior Member
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    It could be that the officer was bluffing to try and get you to cough up the ring. Or, he could have something more than just her word. Maybe a neighbor alleges to have seen you at about the time the things were removed.

    Though it WOULD be suspicious that your clothing was the only other thing taken. Her word, combined with other circumstances and/or witnesses, could well be sufficient for an arrest warrant. The probable cause necessary for an arrest is much lower than that needed for a conviction.

    Do you know anything about the missing ring?

    - Carl


    Thanks for the response Carl. Not sure if you read my whole post, but I clearly stated that I knew nothing about anything he was calling about. Something tells me you are in law enforcement. I live a boringly routine life (work, work and more work) and can account for my whereabouts on any given day if needed. Anyway, defending my innocence more than once in one day is way to much for me, so I can do without your query at this time. I posted on this site merely to get others opinions on what is a new scenario to me, and to get a sense as to if I am residing in a world where someone could just make something up about you and automatically have law enforcement support and efforts in their corner. Call me weird if you want, but I was under the impression that our law enforcement officails in this country would at least complete some basic investigations of one's allegations before they phone someone and accuse them of theft.


    PS How many single, never married woman who have the resources only to own a 13 inch television, posses rings worth very much money? I will leave that one to you Carl.

    Chris Clark
  5. #5
    CdwJava is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainshadow
    Not sure if you read my whole post, but I clearly stated that I knew nothing about anything he was calling about.
    Actually, you stated that you told the detective you knew nothing about the break in, etc. ... it's not the same as not knowing anything about the ring.


    Something tells me you are in law enforcement.
    Yep. It's also in my signature.


    I live a boringly routine life (work, work and more work) and can account for my whereabouts on any given day if needed. Anyway, defending my innocence more than once in one day is way to much for me, so I can do without your query at this time.
    Which query? Whether you know about the ring or not? It seemed simple to me.


    Call me weird if you want, but I was under the impression that our law enforcement officails in this country would at least complete some basic investigations of one's allegations before they phone someone and accuse them of theft.
    It is a common interview technique called "bluffing ". Very often, a guilty person will see the opening to return a stolen or missing item and opt to return it when told that he has been identified. If someone is not guilty, they don't bite.

    We can certainly accuse someone. What we cannot do is make an arrest without probable cause to believe that you indeed committed the crime. But, as I previously posted, the information necessary for an arrest is much less than that needed for a conviction.

    If she says she saw you steal the stuff - or a neighbor says you were there at the time the items were taken, then that would likely be sufficient for an arrest. It may be that the police have nothing. And it may be that they have more than you know - even if it is in error.


    PS How many single, never married woman who have the resources only to own a 13 inch television, posses rings worth very much money? I will leave that one to you Carl.
    I can imagine a lot of things. It tells me nothing. Maybe she doesn't want a TV, maybe she got a ring as a gift. I have no idea.

    If you get arrested, call an attorney. If you don't, then just get on with living. But the police certainly have the right to bluff, and it is not an uncommon interview technique to bluff as the officer did on the phone.

    - Carl
    A Nor Cal Cop Sergeant

    "Make mine a double mocha ...
    And a croissant!"

    Seek justice,
    Love mercy,
    Walk humbly with your God

    -- Courageous, by Casting Crowns ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkM-gDcmJeM
  6. #6
    rainshadow is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks

    Thanks for your advice Carl, and I do apprechiate you taking the time to respond, and you have been helpful. What you refer to as "bluffing", I refer to as disrespect. I feel for and pity individuals that have to make a living by questioning other's integrity in such a way. I thought citizens of the United States were "innocent until proven guilty". Maybe police investigators rationalize this disrepect by encapsulating the behavior as a legitamite interregation technique and label it "bluffing". Either way, I am sure that it has been used for the good of the general public and taken people of the streets who have commited crimes.

    As for those of us who try and live right and obid by the law of the land, it is a good thing that shield in his wallet protects him from the fist of those he disrepects.

    Chris
  7. #7
    CdwJava is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by rainshadow
    What you refer to as "bluffing", I refer to as disrespect.
    Sorry you feel that way. And it may seem disrespectful. But people we deal with don't tend to respond all the time to, "Gee, did ya do it?" Sometimes you have to try a different tack.

    I feel for and pity individuals that have to make a living by questioning other's integrity in such a way.
    Why? Until we live in a society where everyone owns up to their transgressions, the police are going to have to use other methods of ferreting the truth out of criminals. There is nothing dishonorable or wrong about doing that job.

    Now, if eveyone admitted to their crimes, you would have a point. But they don't. They tend to lie. So we have to try and work through that lie. And bluffing of one type or another is simply one method of many.


    I thought citizens of the United States were "innocent until proven guilty".
    They are. But that's a court matter. You and I can form opinions of guilt regardless of what the court system says. I though O.J. was guilty, and I believed Scott Peterson was guilty as well. I'm not the trier of fact, so I can hold that opinion. I can even hold that opinion when I am interviewing someone as a police officer.


    As for those of us who try and live right and obid by the law of the land, it is a good thing that shield in his wallet protects him from the fist of those he disrepects.
    You call it disrespect ... okay. I disagree, but, of course you can call it what you wish.

    Now, back to the matter at hand ... as I said, if he has enough for a warrant, you'll be arrested. If he doesn't, you'll likely never hear from him again.

    If you didn't like his tone you can also complain to his agency, but I did not read anything that indicates he did anything wrong ... but, different agencies have different policies.

    - Carl
    A Nor Cal Cop Sergeant

    "Make mine a double mocha ...
    And a croissant!"

    Seek justice,
    Love mercy,
    Walk humbly with your God

    -- Courageous, by Casting Crowns ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkM-gDcmJeM
  8. #8
    rainshadow is offline Junior Member
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    Thanls

    Thanks Carl, nice talking with you. I am sure your a good policeman and serve your citizens well.
  9. #9
    seniorjudge Guest
    Q: Can someone just say you did something and the police will arrest you?

    A: No. There usually must be some probable cause evidence.


    Are you sure this call was from a cop?
  10. #10
    CRJ student is offline Junior Member
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    Unhappy CRJ student

    Hi! I am new but I am a criminal justice student. I agree with seniorjudge, are u sure it was even a real police officer. I would call your local PDs and find out because the whole thing seems really weird. She may have a friend calling just to harass you if she has these "anger-management" problems this may be her way of dealing with her issues. Also, one of my professors is the former district attorney for the state I live in and in Mississippi, you can press charges on someone for anything and then it is up to them or better yet their attorney to prove other wise. This usually leaves the defendant with a messy and costly situation because this goes on your record unless you have it expunged which is costly. But if she is caught perjuring, then of course she is going to be the one messy situation. Also, if you hear from them again, call their bluff and tell her you have or will bring charges as well for your personal belongings. I know like you said-her son enjoyed them-but it is not worth your record and the hassle.

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