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  1. #1
    msgee Guest

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    I am trying to find out the legal age a juvenile may move out of there parents house without parental consent in the state of Florida.

    Any and all information is appreciated.

    Mick
  2. #2
    LegalBeagle is offline Senior Member
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    Originally posted by msgee
    I am trying to find out the legal age a juvenile may move out of there parents house without parental consent in the state of Florida.

    Any and all information is appreciated.

    Mick
    18.
  3. #3
    Eileen T. is offline Junior Member
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    Exclamation 17 year old moving out (parent conflict)

    I've been reading on the topic on different people's opinion is on the "Legal Age" for moving out, I've read a lot about the age 15 and i think that, yes that is still too young to leave the house but, I also think that it depends on how mature you are if it's to do with that age. Now I am wondering on your views about someone who is 17 and wanting to move out; can a parent legally force their 17 year old to stay home?
  4. #4
    Jacon89 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen T. View Post
    I've been reading on the topic on different people's opinion is on the "Legal Age" for moving out, I've read a lot about the age 15 and i think that, yes that is still too young to leave the house but, I also think that it depends on how mature you are if it's to do with that age. Now I am wondering on your views about someone who is 17 and wanting to move out; can a parent legally force their 17 year old to stay home?
    Well, peoples' opinions on the "legal age" for moving out don't really matter much in reality. Unless a child becomes legally emancipated (which there's very little chance of), then they cannot move out without parental consent until they reach that state's age of majority (18 in this case). Can a parent legally force their 17 year old to stay home? By all means, yes they can. Mom and Pop become Johnny Law until you reach age of majority (or become emancipated, which you really won't).
  5. #5
    Eileen T. is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacon89 View Post
    Well, peoples' opinions on the "legal age" for moving out don't really matter much in reality. Unless a child becomes legally emancipated (which there's very little chance of), then they cannot move out without parental consent until they reach that state's age of majority (18 in this case). Can a parent legally force their 17 year old to stay home? By all means, yes they can. Mom and Pop become Johnny Law until you reach age of majority (or become emancipated, which you really won't).
    Ok, so could the situation change with this scenario?... what if the parent had already given consent to the 17 year old (to move out), for three months the 17 year old is doing well and succeeding but, the parent comes and decides to force the 17 year old to move back, And! what if being back with the family is only damaging the 17 year old because of problems between parents (being thrown back and fourth between fights and getting the blame thrown on him/her)?
  6. #6
    Jacon89 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen T. View Post
    Ok, so could the situation change with this scenario?... what if the parent had already given consent to the 17 year old (to move out), for three months the 17 year old is doing well and succeeding but, the parent comes and decides to force the 17 year old to move back, And! what if being back with the family is only damaging the 17 year old because of problems between parents (being thrown back and fourth between fights and getting the blame thrown on him/her)?
    Until a person reaches age of majority, his or her parents can legally make them return home to live, no matter if consent had been given at any time prior to that point. As far as moving back home being 'damaging' to the 17 year old, that depends on the specifics of the case. If you're seeking emancipation, a court will decide whether or not moving home would be damaging to the child's wellbeing. At any rate, a child cannot decide whether or not this would be damaging to them, in a legal sense, and it makes no difference. CPS might have a say on the matter if it's a severe issue, but as far as moving out on your own for your own reasons, without a truly detrimental reprocussion to living in the parents' home, then the age of consent/parental consent laws still apply.
  7. #7
    Eileen T. is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacon89 View Post
    Until a person reaches age of majority, his or her parents can legally make them return home to live, no matter if consent had been given at any time prior to that point. As far as moving back home being 'damaging' to the 17 year old, that depends on the specifics of the case. If you're seeking emancipation, a court will decide whether or not moving home would be damaging to the child's wellbeing. At any rate, a child cannot decide whether or not this would be damaging to them, in a legal sense, and it makes no difference. CPS might have a say on the matter if it's a severe issue, but as far as moving out on your own for your own reasons, without a truly detrimental reprocussion to living in the parents' home, then the age of consent/parental consent laws still apply.
    ok... so the kid is not in school because he/she has to help the parent/s by working all the time, and when he/she wasn't living with the parent/s he/she was able to do school and focus on his/her future? isn't that a good enough reason. Lets say this child has missed two years of his/her High School because of this, isn't that enough reason?
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    Jacon89 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen T. View Post
    ok... so the kid is not in school because he/she has to help the parent/s by working all the time, and when he/she wasn't living with the parent/s he/she was able to do school and focus on his/her future? isn't that a good enough reason. Lets say this child has missed two years of his/her High School because of this, isn't that enough reason?
    Enough reason, in who's eyes? The kid's? I'm sure. My own? Yes, of course. A court's? I'm not entirely certain, but they might have something to say about it. At any rate, the only way a court will grant an emancipation to a minor before they reach the age of consent is if they are fully able to support themselves on their own (utterly and completely, including insurance, living expenses, schooling, the whole deal), and based on that child's own level of maturity. The odds of getting emancipated are very, very slim, so know that much. Out of all the requests for emancipation filed every year, very few of them are granted.

    If that doesn't answer your question, then I'm not quite sure what you're asking here. Is a lack of schooling reason enough for what, exactly? For the child in question to be magically exempt from age of consent laws, no. If you're in this situation and you have genuine concerns, my advice to you is to contact an agency that deals with these types of cases (a child protection agency, perhaps, but probably not) and explain to them the situation regarding you not being able to attend school, but to be honest, I don't think there's much you can do.
  9. #9
    Eileen T. is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacon89 View Post
    Enough reason, in who's eyes? The kid's? I'm sure. My own? Yes, of course. A court's? I'm not entirely certain, but they might have something to say about it. At any rate, the only way a court will grant an emancipation to a minor before they reach the age of consent is if they are fully able to support themselves on their own (utterly and completely, including insurance, living expenses, schooling, the whole deal), and based on that child's own level of maturity. The odds of getting emancipated are very, very slim, so know that much. Out of all the requests for emancipation filed every year, very few of them are granted.

    If that doesn't answer your question, then I'm not quite sure what you're asking here. Is a lack of schooling reason enough for what, exactly? For the child in question to be magically exempt from age of consent laws, no. If you're in this situation and you have genuine concerns, my advice to you is to contact an agency that deals with these types of cases (a child protection agency, perhaps, but probably not) and explain to them the situation regarding you not being able to attend school, but to be honest, I don't think there's much you can do.
    No no... Thank you for your replies they are a big help... and it's not about me but someone really close that i asked these questions, now i know where abouts i stand. Gracias/Thank you once again
  10. #10
    LdiJ is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eileen T. View Post
    ok... so the kid is not in school because he/she has to help the parent/s by working all the time, and when he/she wasn't living with the parent/s he/she was able to do school and focus on his/her future? isn't that a good enough reason. Lets say this child has missed two years of his/her High School because of this, isn't that enough reason?
    That's enough reason to get CPS involved in the case to get the child yanked from the parent's home. That's educational neglect.
  11. #11
    stealth2 is offline Senior Member
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    Eileen - it's considered poor form to hijack someone else's thread.
  12. #12
    Blue Meanie is offline Senior Member
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    This thread is 7 years old. EllenT is necroposting AND hijacking.
  13. #13
    LdiJ is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by baystategirl View Post
    This thread is 7 years old. EllenT is necroposting AND hijacking.
    I didn't even CATCH that!!!
  14. #14
    stealth2 is offline Senior Member
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    LOL Neither did I!
  15. #15
    Jacon89 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by baystategirl View Post
    This thread is 7 years old. EllenT is necroposting AND hijacking.
    Holy hell, seven years? I didn't even bother to check the thread date when I saw it being posted in recently.

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