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  1. #1
    Jason25 is offline Junior Member
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    How to disown a parent?

    What is the name of your state? Arizona

    Hi, I am new to this forum and tried doing some searching but couldn't find the info i was looking for.

    That being said, i was wondering if anyone knew of the requirements (what is entailed) to legally disown/divorce one's biological parent?

    I am 25 years old and am specifically looking for information on what is required to disown one of my parents.

    If anyone could help me with this or point me to a webpage with information on this I would appreciate it.

    Thank you.

    Jason
  2. #2
    seniorjudge is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason25
    What is the name of your state? Arizona

    Hi, I am new to this forum and tried doing some searching but couldn't find the info i was looking for.

    That being said, i was wondering if anyone knew of the requirements (what is entailed) to legally disown/divorce one's biological parent?

    I am 25 years old and am specifically looking for information on what is required to disown one of my parents.

    If anyone could help me with this or point me to a webpage with information on this I would appreciate it.

    Thank you.

    Jason
    Q: That being said, i was wondering if anyone knew of the requirements (what is entailed) to legally disown/divorce one's biological parent?

    A: There is no such thing.
    There are two rules for success:

    (1) Never tell everything you know.
  3. #3
    Blue Meanie is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason25
    What is the name of your state? Arizona

    Hi, I am new to this forum and tried doing some searching but couldn't find the info i was looking for.

    That being said, i was wondering if anyone knew of the requirements (what is entailed) to legally disown/divorce one's biological parent?

    I am 25 years old and am specifically looking for information on what is required to disown one of my parents.

    If anyone could help me with this or point me to a webpage with information on this I would appreciate it.

    Thank you.

    Jason
    You're 25...just don't have anything to do with them...There is no Legal statute for it...Unless it's called moving out of the basement apartment...
  4. #4
    Jason25 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by seniorjudge
    Q: That being said, i was wondering if anyone knew of the requirements (what is entailed) to legally disown/divorce one's biological parent?

    A: There is no such thing.
    Ok, i wasn't sure...thats why i posted the question. thanks for the reply.
  5. #5
    Bali Hai is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason25
    Ok, i wasn't sure...thats why i posted the question. thanks for the reply.
    You asked how to disown or divorce your parent.

    Are you looking for monetary gain in such an action? What other reason could there be??

    Get yourself a job junior. You can EARN your way now at 25 years old just like everybody else. Your parent(s) don't legally owe you a damn thing at this point.

    As a matter of fact, YOU OWE THEM right now and counting.
  6. #6
    Jason25 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bali Hai
    You asked how to disown or divorce your parent.

    Are you looking for monetary gain in such an action? What other reason could there be??

    Get yourself a job junior. You can EARN your way now at 25 years old just like everybody else. Your parent(s) don't legally owe you a damn thing at this point.

    As a matter of fact, YOU OWE THEM right now and counting.
    You are correct, i asked about how to DISOWN one of my biological parents. People make money from disowning one of their parents these days? thats news to me old man.

    But, i tell ya what since you know how to make a buck off of disowning someone; since i was not aware of this, i will cut you a check right now for this invaluable information...oh wait, that money in my checking account is a figment of my imagination...maybe you can do this Pro Bono case for me...you are genius man, i tell ya.
  7. #7
    beamsaber is offline Junior Member
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    Ha!!

    Wow.. I seem to be seeing the same responses to people who want to disown parents as an adult.

    Allow me to ask a couple of questions of the *brilliant* people who told Jason25 to "go get a job" when he asked the question.

    1 - Who is responsible for his parents debts when they die? hmmm.. him.
    2 - Who is responsible for his parents medical if they become incapacitated?.. hmmm.. Oh yeah, him.
    3 - Who is responsible for seeing to funeral arrangements for the parent he wants to divorce?... oh yeah, that's him too.

    There are still legal obligations which Jason25 has toward his parents. The question then, if I may frame it better, is how does a person remove any legal ties with their abusive parent once they are no longer a minor? I ask because I'm also looking for an answer for my wife..

    Peas Doodz!
    -B
  8. #8
    wyett717 is offline Member
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    1 - Who is responsible for his parents debts when they die? hmmm.. him.
    2 - Who is responsible for his parents medical if they become incapacitated?.. hmmm.. Oh yeah, him.
    3 - Who is responsible for seeing to funeral arrangements for the parent he wants to divorce?... oh yeah, that's him too.
    He isn't required to take care of any of these. Debtors may threaten next of kin to settle up on debts, but if the child isn't named on the debts, he/she isn't responsible for them.

    As for the medical... what parent in their right mind would want an estranged child responsible for their medical care??? If I had a severed relationship with someone, I sure as hell wouldn't ask them to make life and death decisions about me.

    Funeral arrangements can be made by anyone, children are not required to do this. It's unfair for everyone who has to buck up the funeral expenses, but there is no law stating the child has to do it.

    Your attitude seems like one that would be easy to "disown/divorce" anyway.
  9. #9
    mistoffolees is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by beamsaber View Post
    Wow.. I seem to be seeing the same responses to people who want to disown parents as an adult.

    Allow me to ask a couple of questions of the *brilliant* people who told Jason25 to "go get a job" when he asked the question.

    1 - Who is responsible for his parents debts when they die? hmmm.. him.
    2 - Who is responsible for his parents medical if they become incapacitated?.. hmmm.. Oh yeah, him.
    3 - Who is responsible for seeing to funeral arrangements for the parent he wants to divorce?... oh yeah, that's him too.

    There are still legal obligations which Jason25 has toward his parents. The question then, if I may frame it better, is how does a person remove any legal ties with their abusive parent once they are no longer a minor? I ask because I'm also looking for an answer for my wife..

    Peas Doodz!
    -B
    Jason has NONE of those obligations toward his parents (unless he chooses to take them on). The estate owes those debts and if the estate has insufficient resources, then the doctors, banks, hospitals, etc lose out.

    And you're not going to get a different answer no matter how many times you change your ID and post the same question.
  10. #10
    MrOutCastX is offline Junior Member
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    I have another reason for needing to disown my parent:
    I can't recieve a pelgrant and go to college until I'm 25 unless I have my mother's help or she is legally seperated from me. OR dead, of course, dare we dream.
    But I just turned 21 and I can't wait four more years just to get any sort of education. As it is I've already had to wait from 18 and I'm sure everyone can imagine how hard it is to survive with only a diploma.
    So without being rude, does anyone have any advice?
  11. #11
    Zigner is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOutCastX View Post
    I have another reason for needing to disown my parent:
    I can't recieve a pelgrant and go to college until I'm 25 unless I have my mother's help or she is legally seperated from me. OR dead, of course, dare we dream.
    But I just turned 21 and I can't wait four more years just to get any sort of education. As it is I've already had to wait from 18 and I'm sure everyone can imagine how hard it is to survive with only a diploma.
    So without being rude, does anyone have any advice?
    I would suggest that you start your own thread...and stop wishing your mom dead.
  12. #12
    neopandora is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOutCastX View Post
    I have another reason for needing to disown my parent:
    I can't recieve a pelgrant and go to college until I'm 25 unless I have my mother's help or she is legally seperated from me. OR dead, of course, dare we dream.
    But I just turned 21 and I can't wait four more years just to get any sort of education. As it is I've already had to wait from 18 and I'm sure everyone can imagine how hard it is to survive with only a diploma.
    So without being rude, does anyone have any advice?
    Actually, that's not the only way. You can be a veteran of the armed forces, get married, have a child that is your dependent, and/or be homeless.

    Each school can also make a "professional judgment" to override the dependency status. What that means is that you meet with the school and show them utility and rent receipts in your name from the provider, that you have a job to maintain same and proof that you support yourself entirely along with an explanation that you have no contact with your parents to get independent status.

    So, if you really are independent there are a myriad of ways to get same for student aid. If you aren't really independent and standing on your own, there is no legal paper shuffle to otherwise establish same.
  13. #13
    st-kitts is offline Member
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    If you can answer No to all of the following questions, you are considered a dependent student on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA):

    Were you born before January 1, 1989?
    As of today are you married?
    At the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year, will you be working on a master's or doctorate program (such as an MA, MBA, MD, JD, PhD, EdD, or graduate certificate, etc.)?
    Are you currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training?
    Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces?
    Do you have children who will receive more than half of their support from you between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013?
    Do you have dependents (other than your children or spouse) who live with you and who receive more than half of their support from you, now and through June 30, 2013?
    At any time since you turned age 13, were both your parents deceased, were you in foster care or were you a dependent or ward of the court?
    As determined by a court in your state of legal residence, are you or were you an emancipated minor?
    As determined by a court in your state of legal residence, are you or were you in legal guardianship?
    At any time on or after July 1, 2011, did your high school or school district homeless liaison determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?
    At any time on or after July 1, 2011, did the director of an emergency shelter or transitional housing program funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless?
    At any time on or after July 1, 2011, did the director of a runaway or homeless youth basic center or transitional living program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was homeless or were self-supporting and at risk of being homeless?
    If you are considered a dependent student, your parents must answer the parental questions on the FAFSA.

    If you can answer Yes to any of the questions above, you are considered an independent student and information about your parents is not required on the FAFSA .

    Note: Health profession students may be required to provide parental information regardless of their dependency status.

    If you have a special circumstance that prevents you from providing parental information you may be able to submit your FAFSA. However, your FAFSA will be incomplete. You must contact the financial office at your college and provide them with documentation to verify your situation.
  14. #14
    Zigner is offline Senior Member
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    Why are you guys encouraging the necro-posting hijacker?
  15. #15
    metfan012 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrOutCastX View Post
    I have another reason for needing to disown my parent:
    I can't recieve a pelgrant and go to college until I'm 25 unless I have my mother's help or she is legally seperated from me. OR dead, of course, dare we dream.
    But I just turned 21 and I can't wait four more years just to get any sort of education. As it is I've already had to wait from 18 and I'm sure everyone can imagine how hard it is to survive with only a diploma.
    So without being rude, does anyone have any advice?
    Hi MrOutcast, I will post something and I will not be rude. I am not sure why posters cannot just give advice and leave their moral outrage at home.

    I applaud you that you want to go to college because, as a 50 yr looking in, most of the 18-23 yrs olds I know just sit at home.

    I too went thru what you did. I was living with my dad and he refused to give Financial Aid his tax return information for selfish reasons. I was on my own. My mom had already passed away. Fortunatly for me, in those days Junior college was very inexpensive. I ended up with a part-time job, going to school and living on my own. But again it was easier then.

    I suggest you: 1st go to a community college where rates are cheaper. You can usually get a fee waiver and it is Self-Certification. That means you don't need any documentation for the information you put down. Put down 0 income since that is the truth.

    Once you start college, do very well and you can apply for scholarships and alot of them don't even have to be academic. I got one from the Single Parent Association for being a single parent. Also scholarships are provided to minorities. Get a book loan if they still have those. I got one.

    Get a job, even a small one. Save up to finish your degree at a 4yr institution. By then you will be 25?

    Good luck I hope this helps
    Last edited by metfan012; 02-16-2012 at 02:41 PM.

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