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  1. #1
    cherimila is offline Junior Member
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    What state can I marry my illegal mexican boyfriend who has a expired passport.

    Missour I want to know what state can I marry my illegal mexican boyfriend, he has a mexican birth certificate and expired passport. I am a legal citizen. We plan to marry later, we are in process of getting joint accts. and insurance and we are serious not just for his citizenship. I live in mo. but illinois is just 3 miles away. I just want to know what states?

    Thanks
  2. #2
    JETX is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherimila View Post
    I want to know what state can I marry my illegal mexican boyfriend
    You can marry him in any state you want. However, that won't waive the fact that he is and will remain a criminal.
  3. #3
    proud_parent is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherimila View Post
    I want to know what state can I marry my illegal mexican boyfriend
    Let's see...there's Chihuahua, Sonora, Jalisco, Veracruz...

    (Just remember to bring your birth certificate and current passport.)
  4. #4
    candg918 is offline Member
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    Marrying him will not allow him to obtain legal status. You need to consult with an attorney in order to have a reality check about the future you face.
  5. #5
    Proserpina is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cherimila View Post
    Missour I want to know what state can I marry my illegal mexican boyfriend, he has a mexican birth certificate and expired passport. I am a legal citizen. We plan to marry later, we are in process of getting joint accts. and insurance and we are serious not just for his citizenship. I live in mo. but illinois is just 3 miles away. I just want to know what states?

    Thanks
    As has been said, getting married is not your problem - your boyfriend's status is the problem.

    But much may depend on the cause of his being out of status - you said his passport expired, but did he enter the country legally and overstay? Or did he enter illegally (without inspection)? The answer does make a difference.
  6. #6
    orchidflower is offline Junior Member
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    I know of many that married illegal aliens. I think he must first renew his passport. Then after you marry promptly file for adjustment of status (i485 packet). I know others who did this and had to pay a fine for being here illegally (maybe 1-2k) and filed for work permit to be able to work etc in the meantime. Provided he does not have criminal record here can work.

    You have to file I think i-130 affidavit of support to show you can support him with your income and guarantee he will not be any trouble here.

    This happened a lot here in AZ. Though of course you should check with attorney since laws do change. I would also not recommend filing in AZ- you should check the uscis website for the state you want to live and compare their processing time. Here I its one of the longest waits since this is frequent occurrence as we are on the border.
  7. #7
    evcalyptos is offline Senior Member
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    orchidflower, I'm sorry to shoot down a new member, but pretty much everything in your post is incorrect.
    Quote Originally Posted by orchidflower View Post
    I know of many that married illegal aliens. I think he must first renew his passport. Then after you marry promptly file for adjustment of status (i485 packet). I know others who did this and had to pay a fine for being here illegally (maybe 1-2k) and filed for work permit to be able to work etc in the meantime. Provided he does not have criminal record here can work.
    Incorrect. The fine and ability to file I-485 is limited to a very very narrow category of 'illegals' who had petitions filed for them years and years ago.

    If a person entered illegally (snuck across the border) they are not eligible to file I-485 no way, no how.
    that's why the previous poster asked the original poster to clarify.

    You have to file I think i-130 affidavit of support to show you can support him with your income and guarantee he will not be any trouble here.
    The affidavit of support is form I-864. It is a contract that promises that the US citizen will repay any means-tested benefits (welfare) the foreign spouse uses. It's no guarantee that the person won't be any trouble.
    Form I-130 is the petition a US citizen spouse files to make the foreign spouse eligible to file I-485 (if they are otherwise eligible) or apply for a visa overseas.

    This happened a lot here in AZ. Though of course you should check with attorney since laws do change. I would also not recommend filing in AZ- you should check the uscis website for the state you want to live and compare their processing time. Here I its one of the longest waits since this is frequent occurrence as we are on the border.
    All filing is now done nationally and processing times have evened out considerably.
    Filing is done based on the applicant's home address, in this case Missouri, so she would not be filing anything in AZ (and waiting times currently in AZ aren't any different from anywhere else in the country).

    I answered this not to pick on you, orchid, but to correct the misinformation and underscore how frequently things change. As you'll be going forward with your own immigration process, you'll see how the details really do matter.
  8. #8
    Proserpina is offline Senior Member
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    (that was an awesome post evcalyptos)

    We're referring to.... 245 (i), yes? Back in 98? Somewhere around then?
  9. #9
    evcalyptos is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogmatique View Post
    (that was an awesome post evcalyptos)

    We're referring to.... 245 (i), yes? Back in 98? Somewhere around then?
    Yes. aka 'amnesty'.
  10. #10
    Proserpina is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by evcalyptos View Post
    Yes. aka 'amnesty'.
    While I do realize this isn't a current affairs board I do sometimes - in those quieter moments - wonder if something similar will happen in the near future.
  11. #11
    evcalyptos is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogmatique View Post
    While I do realize this isn't a current affairs board I do sometimes - in those quieter moments - wonder if something similar will happen in the near future.
    Oh yes, expect it. The Obama administration has put 'comprehensive immigration reform' aka CIR on the agenda for 2010. It's desperately needed, but unfortunately, this doesn't seem to be the group of people (Congress) who are mature enough to look at the entire system and make a new one. Not tack more onto the existing law (written in 1952). It's like the tax code.. ridiculous with the way exceptions and 'if, then' arguments scattered throughout it.

    With the extreme changes in our society, travel, communications and the general 'shrinking' of the world, immigration should be something that the average joe can read, understand and apply for without all the gotchas and unfairness. And while they're at it, revise all the local 'guidelines' and interpretations that make immigration policy actually VARY between the 50 states. It's insane.

    First they need to get the health insurance debate sorted, and they'd better get it right or well on the way to right. The behavior that congress (and the White House) are displaying right now doesn't redeem any of them in my eyes right now. They love this back and forth because it's job security for them. Nevermind if they break the rest of us while they're having their fun.


    Glad you asked?
  12. #12
    cyjeff is offline Senior Member
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    I don't want to hijack the board, but I want to ask this.

    How do we repay all of the people that paid all that money to immigrate legally when everyone who DIDN'T pay all that money to immigrate legally are granted amnesty?

    Hardly seems fair.
  13. #13
    Proserpina is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyjeff View Post
    I don't want to hijack the board, but I want to ask this.

    How do we repay all of the people that paid all that money to immigrate legally when everyone who DIDN'T pay all that money to immigrate legally are granted amnesty?

    Hardly seems fair.
    You mean...like me?

    Oh boy. I have to be brutally honest - it used to irk me that I did it the legal way, the right way, and spent a considerable about of money to do so (and it's not like I had buckets of dollars to throw away willy nilly) while knowing that in some cases amnesty was awarded to those who had broken at least one major US Law.

    But on the other hand....

    ...I have to be practical. We have (and had) many illegal immigrants. In offering a possible way to legitimize we enabled them to become legal tax-paying residents who can contribute to the economy on both a local and national scale. True, the fine that was paid during that amnesty was nowhere near the actual cost of obtaining residency via the usual channels. And it's true that not every immigrant who succeeded in obtaining amnesty actually went on to "make a difference", so to speak.

    But yet I still can't - and blame it on my European hippie liberal upbringing - say that amnesty is, was, or will be...a bad thing in and of itself.

    (though if someone wants to refund my checks I'd be more than happy to relieve them of that burden... )

    (and evcalyptos? Oh heck yes! I don't think I've ever been NOT glad talking with you )
  14. #14
    evcalyptos is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyjeff View Post
    I don't want to hijack the board, but I want to ask this.

    How do we repay all of the people that paid all that money to immigrate legally when everyone who DIDN'T pay all that money to immigrate legally are granted amnesty?

    Hardly seems fair.
    I've moved past 'fair'. It wasn't all that difficult for my family members to immigrate, even though there were various backlogs etc at the time. It wasn't all that expensive (a couple grand).
    12 million people is an immovable number. People need to get over the idea that you can expel these folks.

    This editorial from the weekend put it well IMO

    There is room for reframing and repackaging the immigration debate so that it does not become a replay of the Bush administration's failed attempts of 2006 and 2007. But to be successful in reshaping the country's dysfunctional system, any legislation needs to recognize economic realities: that millions of immigrant workers are here to stay, that many or most do jobs that native-born Americans don't want, and that Mexico's comparative poverty will continue to drive immigrants north to a better life.

    Recession or no recession, a comprehensive reform bill must provide a way out of this mess born of neglect by offering a path to legality for undocumented immigrants already here and a mechanism for future workers, skilled and unskilled, to enter the country in adequate numbers to meet the job market's demands.


    I'm not blind to the problem, and I've worked through the 'unfair'. This is a generational issue that goes back to the development of the Western US, not a bunch of 'law breakers' who are just doing whatever they want. They are operating under the rules, spoken and not, that have run the border all these years.

    'Amnesty' is a charged word now, and I choose not to use it for CIR. People will pay, just like they do now (USCIS is fee-funded) and all communities will benefit when everyone can participate fully.

    DM, just see your comments now.. I was the reverse migrant. Fell in love with my European hippie liberal while I was 'visiting' and I just stayed too. Fortunately with the EEU family permit, the movement of people is a usual thing and as long as you've got the money, you can stay most places..
    The problem in the US is that people don't mind letting in the pretty Euros, it's those brown people next door we mind. They aren't going away, so we may as well create a practical way to deal with it so they can come and go.
  15. #15
    JETX is offline Senior Member
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    Actually, the solution is very simple!!!

    Make it a mandatory $1,000 per person fine for every:
    1) Illegal employee you have.
    2) Illegal tenant or resident of an apartment that you rented to.
    3) Medical treatment that you provided.

    We won't have to worry about deporting them. Remove the incentive (including amnesty)... and they'll go home on their own.

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