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Thread: 17 year old wants to move out

  1. #1
    nightingale1221 is offline Junior Member
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    17 year old wants to move out

    What is the name of your state?What is the name of your state? Michigan

    My 16 year old daughter was advised by "someone" that she can move out at the age of 17 (she will be 17 in 4 months). She has been telling me for a year that she intends to move in with her boyfriend's family when she is old enough, and now that she has heard this news, she thinks she can move even sooner. Her intention is to move when she graduates high school in June of 2006, though she will not be 18 until Dec. of 2006. Can she move legally without my permission?
  2. #2
    Happy Trails is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by nightingale1221
    What is the name of your state?What is the name of your state? Michigan

    My 16 year old daughter was advised by "someone" that she can move out at the age of 17 (she will be 17 in 4 months). She has been telling me for a year that she intends to move in with her boyfriend's family when she is old enough, and now that she has heard this news, she thinks she can move even sooner. Her intention is to move when she graduates high school in June of 2006, though she will not be 18 until Dec. of 2006. Can she move legally without my permission?
    Age of majority in Michigan is 18.

    Until that age you are legally responsible for her, unless she is emancipated. The people housing her could get into trouble for harboring a runaway, contributing to the delinquency of a minor**************
  3. #3
    Neur0 is offline Junior Member
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    State is Tennessee.

    My question is similar to the above. My boyfriend's parents are moving soon and we're trying to prevent him from going through any means possible. I'd like to do this legaly though. So, could he move out of his house without his parents permission at 17? He'll be 17 in 2 months. Thanks!
  4. #4
    titansfan Guest

    Lightbulb to neur0

    your bf cant legally move from his parents untill hes 18. hes under their care and control untill then, im sorry, but he has to stay with his parents, he has no choice. if he leaves without their permission, he can be reported as a ruanway, and you and your parents can be charged with harboring a runaway and/or interference with custody.
  5. #5
    Happy Trails is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neur0
    State is Tennessee.

    My question is similar to the above. My boyfriend's parents are moving soon and we're trying to prevent him from going through any means possible. I'd like to do this legaly though. So, could he move out of his house without his parents permission at 17? He'll be 17 in 2 months. Thanks!
    Titansfan is correct. The age of majority in Tennessee is 18, so b/f is the parents legal responsibility. Unless the parents agree that the b/f can stay with other relatives or friends, he goes with the parents. They can file charges on anyone who interferes with their custody.

    BTW, Tennessee does not have statutes allowing emancipation of a minor child. He'll have to ride this out until he is an adult.
  6. #6
    hpdarkman88 is offline Junior Member
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    What about me

    I am currently 17, that is until Dec. 14th. but my mother and i have been butting heads since seventh grade. she currently has become so tired of me that she wishes to kick me out of the house and force me to move into my dads house. unfortunately my stepmother refuses to let me move into their house. my question is this, what can i do to move out on my own before i turn 18 legally, and what rights do i have until and after she kicks me out.

    I live in illinios if that makes any difference.
  7. #7
    stealth2 is offline Senior Member
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    It would really help if you people started your own threads instead of hijacking existing ones.
  8. #8
    shutyourface Guest

    tell daughter if she leaves you will call police

    Quote Originally Posted by nightingale1221 View Post
    What is the name of your state?What is the name of your state? Michigan

    My 16 year old daughter was advised by "someone" that she can move out at the age of 17 (she will be 17 in 4 months). She has been telling me for a year that she intends to move in with her boyfriend's family when she is old enough, and now that she has heard this news, she thinks she can move even sooner. Her intention is to move when she graduates high school in June of 2006, though she will not be 18 until Dec. of 2006. Can she move legally without my permission?
    tell your daughter the minute she walks out the door, you will be on the phone with the police reporting her as a runaway, and she will get her butt hauled home where she belongs.
  9. #9
    The Occultist is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by shutyourface View Post
    tell your daughter the minute she walks out the door, you will be on the phone with the police reporting her as a runaway, and she will get her butt hauled home where she belongs.
    Pay attention to the dates of the posts. This thread was started over a year ago. I'm pretty sure the OP is long gone. Sorry if darkman confused you with his hijacking.
  10. #10
    BobtheLawman23 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy Trails View Post
    Age of majority in Michigan is 18.

    Until that age you are legally responsible for her, unless she is emancipated. The people housing her could get into trouble for harboring a runaway, contributing to the delinquency of a minor**************
    That is false In the state of Michigan, in order to get charged for Harboring a Runaway, the Runaway has the be under the age of 17, in that law it states that a "minor" or a "child" is under the age of 17 therefore at the age of 17, you aren't consider a minor, BUT you aren't an Adult!
  11. #11
    Astrolink is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobtheLawman23 View Post
    That is false In the state of Michigan, in order to get charged for Harboring a Runaway, the Runaway has the be under the age of 17, in that law it states that a "minor" or a "child" is under the age of 17 therefore at the age of 17, you aren't consider a minor, BUT you aren't an Adult!

    My goodness...this post is in response to one that is so old that former President Bush was only part way into his second term....
  12. #12
    TheGeekess is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobtheLawman23 View Post
    That is false In the state of Michigan, in order to get charged for Harboring a Runaway, the Runaway has the be under the age of 17, in that law it states that a "minor" or a "child" is under the age of 17 therefore at the age of 17, you aren't consider a minor, BUT you aren't an Adult!
    The thread you have posted to is SEVEN years old. OP's daughter has been adult for several years now.

    This forum prefers that one NOT necropost.
    quincy likes this.
  13. #13
    BobtheLawman23 is offline Junior Member
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    Yeah, but it still comes up on the first page of google! And I wanted to set this straight!
  14. #14
    I'mTheFather is offline Senior Member
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    Well, thank GOODNESS that was straightened out!!!
  15. #15
    quincy is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobtheLawman23 View Post
    That is false In the state of Michigan, in order to get charged for Harboring a Runaway, the Runaway has the be under the age of 17, in that law it states that a "minor" or a "child" is under the age of 17 therefore at the age of 17, you aren't consider a minor, BUT you aren't an Adult!
    Actually, that is not right, BobtheLawman. I think you have confused, rather than clarified, the law.

    MCL 722.151 states: "No person shall knowingly and willfully aid or abet a child under the age of 17 to violate an order of a juvenile court, or knowingly and willfully conceal or harbor juvenile runaways who have taken flight from the custody of the court, their parents or legal guardian." (bolding added)

    A juvenile is defined by the age of majority in a state. In Michigan, that age is 18.

    Because there is an Interstate Compact for Juveniles, the "harboring a runaway" law in Michigan defines a juvenile as 18 for a Michigan runaway, and defines any juvenile from another state by the age of majority in that state from which the juvenile ran away.

    Now can this poor old thread be put to rest? Thanks.
    Last edited by quincy; 09-28-2013 at 10:57 PM.
    TheGeekess likes this.

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