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  1. #1
    munkyt is offline Junior Member
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    Drug testing for minors?

    What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? CA
    My nephew (high school - age 15) had red eyes and the teacher accused him of being high. He said he had allergies. She sent him to office. The office sent him to the hospital with the paramedics for drug testing and they did NOT call the mother until after he was at the hospital. Don't they need permission from parents first?
    He has sensitive eyes and suffers from allergies. He admitted to smoking weed earlier in the week, but says he didn't that day.What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)?
  2. #2
    Isis1 is offline Senior Member
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    He had the right to say no. Did he submit his urine for drug testing?
  3. #3
    Antigone* is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by munkyt View Post
    What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? CA
    My nephew (high school - age 15) had red eyes and the teacher accused him of being high. He said he had allergies. She sent him to office. The office sent him to the hospital with the paramedics for drug testing and they did NOT call the mother until after he was at the hospital. Don't they need permission from parents first?
    He has sensitive eyes and suffers from allergies. He admitted to smoking weed earlier in the week, but says he didn't that day.What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)?
    Isis, they may have been worried about his immediate medical condition. It is a good thing they did, now mom knows that she has a kid with allergies and a drug problem.
  4. #4
    CdwJava is offline Senior Member
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    If they called the medics then they suspected he was far worse off than being a little buzzed. I doubt the medics are going to transport a kid who is merely a little high, so I suspect someone had some reason to believe he was a little more ripped than is being characterized. Or, he was having one HECK of an allergic reaction to something ... which might be possible.

    If the police get involved he will have the right to an attorney. If no police are involved, then he may only face suspension or, maybe, expulsion.

    The school should probably have notified the parents ASAP about the medical situation. Typically, if mom or dad are not available, then either the school, law enforcement, or CPS will attend the hospital to take temporary custody of the child so that he can be evaluated and treated. I cannot see that they would just pop him in an ambulance and be done with it.

    Hopefully mom and dad will get the kid some help if his test comes back positive for controlled substances.
    A Nor Cal Cop Sergeant

    "Make mine a double mocha ...
    And a croissant!"

    Seek justice,
    Love mercy,
    Walk humbly with your God

    -- Courageous, by Casting Crowns ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkM-gDcmJeM
  5. #5
    Billy II is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Isis1 View Post
    He had the right to say no. Did he submit his urine for drug testing?
    He sure does, but he does not have the CAPACITY to say no. Someone could point a loaded gun to my head & demand that I do something & I still would not.
    But I have been trained for these situations.

    A 15 yr old kid? Easy manipulated by an adult.

    The question I would have: what efforts did they make to contact the parents?

    Clearly they did try & did reach the parent(s) ... did they take the kid to the clinic and then call?

    This situation stinks to high heaven.

    "he admitted to smoking earlier in the week?" give me 20 minutes and he would tell me anything I wanted him to say..that he killed Abe Lincoln...

    Coercive threats, pain application etc will work most of the time with untrained people -- they'll tell you anything you want.
  6. #6
    stealth2 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy II View Post
    Someone could point a loaded gun to my head & demand that I do something & I still would not.
    But I have been trained for these situations.
    LOL I have a feeling you'd be crying like a little girl and doing anything they asked.
  7. #7
    CdwJava is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy II View Post
    He sure does, but he does not have the CAPACITY to say no. Someone could point a loaded gun to my head & demand that I do something & I still would not.
    But I have been trained for these situations.

    A 15 yr old kid? Easy manipulated by an adult.
    Legally, he (arguably) has the ability to understand this. If this were a criminal case, he might have an uphill battle. As it is NOT a criminal matter, if this was a medical issue, then the school might be capable of consenting to treatment on the parents' behalf.

    The question I would have: what efforts did they make to contact the parents?
    If the parents choose to make an issue out of this, they can certainly ask that question. I would hope, though, that they are not going to castigate the school for looking after the health and welfare of their child (assuming there was some basis to believe that medical aid was necessary ... and given the fact he was apparently transported by ambulance, I would assume that this was the case).

    Clearly they did try & did reach the parent(s) ... did they take the kid to the clinic and then call?
    Maybe.

    This situation stinks to high heaven.
    Maybe. But, what motivation might the school have aside from the health of the child? There may have been some missteps, but I don't think there is any grand conspiracy to abuse or violate the kid. Such a plot would require not only two or more school staffers conspiring together, but also the medics falsifying information to justify a transport to the hospital. What are the odds of all that happening?

    "he admitted to smoking earlier in the week?" give me 20 minutes and he would tell me anything I wanted him to say..that he killed Abe Lincoln...
    Let's see ... the guy I talked to tonight that was higher than a kite admitted to using dope two years ago ... it was actually more like two hours before the contact.

    In this instance these were school staffers, not cops. They did not apparently get an admission about anything else, much less anything criminal.

    Coercive threats, pain application etc will work most of the time with untrained people -- they'll tell you anything you want.
    Okay, these were school teachers, not the rogues at Abu Ghraib. Tone it back a little.
    A Nor Cal Cop Sergeant

    "Make mine a double mocha ...
    And a croissant!"

    Seek justice,
    Love mercy,
    Walk humbly with your God

    -- Courageous, by Casting Crowns ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkM-gDcmJeM

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