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  1. #1
    mikemojc is offline Junior Member
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    Question Son wants to move out at 17 against our wishes in Missouri

    What is the name of your state?What is the name of your state?What is the name of your state? Missouri

    My son turns 17 in a few months and intends to move in with friends as soon as he does. We dont want him to move out, as we are concerned that he will not finish high school or get into trouble with the law if he is out on his own. People we've talked to locally tell us that Missouri law is vague about 17 year olds moving away without parental consent. I have read all the Missouri Bar Association pamphlets I could find that might relate; Juvenile law, Out on your own, Custody issues, but haven't seen anything that tells me if the law allows him to move out against our will or not.

    Can we "make" him stay at home, report him as a runaway?
    Can we "make" him stay in school, report as a juvenile delinquent?
    If the law does allow him to move out can we, as his parents, be held legally responsable for his action until he turns 18?

    Help pointing us to available documentation or other resources is greatly appreciated!
  2. #2
    brisgirl825 is offline Senior Member
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    He can't move w/o your permission until the age of majority...18 years of age.

    [url]http://www.uslegalforms.com/lawdigest/ageofmajority.php/MO/MO-099A-FF.htm[/url]
  3. #3
    mikemojc is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by brisgirl825
    He can't move w/o your permission until the age of majority...18 years of age.

    [url]http://www.uslegalforms.com/lawdigest/ageofmajority.php/MO/MO-099A-FF.htm[/url]
    The part about Missouri Law being vague is true. See Below:

    [url]http://www.moga.state.mo.us/statutes/C200-299/2110000021.HTM[/url]

    Missouri Revised Statutes
    Chapter 211
    Juvenile Courts
    Section 211.021

    August 28, 2004


    Definitions.
    211.021. As used in this chapter, unless the context clearly requires otherwise:

    (1) "Adult" means a person seventeen years of age or older; (bold added for emphasis)

    (2) "Child" means a person under seventeen years of age;

    (3) "Juvenile court" means the juvenile division or divisions of the circuit court of the county, or judges while hearing juvenile cases assigned to them; .....


    So you can see why I'd be confused. By this definition, he is an adult. At the same time, he cannot legally enter into a contract, or do any of the other things one has to be 18 years old to do.

    Help?
  4. #4
    Happy Trails is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikemojc
    The part about Missouri Law being vague is true. See Below:

    [url]http://www.moga.state.mo.us/statutes/C200-299/2110000021.HTM[/url]

    Missouri Revised Statutes
    Chapter 211
    Juvenile Courts
    Section 211.021

    August 28, 2004


    Definitions.
    211.021. As used in this chapter, unless the context clearly requires otherwise:

    (1) "Adult" means a person seventeen years of age or older; (bold added for emphasis)

    (2) "Child" means a person under seventeen years of age;

    (3) "Juvenile court" means the juvenile division or divisions of the circuit court of the county, or judges while hearing juvenile cases assigned to them; .....


    So you can see why I'd be confused. By this definition, he is an adult. At the same time, he cannot legally enter into a contract, or do any of the other things one has to be 18 years old to do.

    Help?
    The statute you posted is in the chapter referring to Juvenile Courts. It simply is saying if your son gets into legal trouble, he will not be going to juvenile court. (See below.)

    The purpose of this chapter is to facilitate the care, protection and discipline of children who come within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court.

    Go further down in the chapter and you find:

    Definitions.
    211.442. As used in sections 211.442 to 211.487, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, the following terms mean:

    (1) "Child", an individual under eighteen years of age;

    (2) "Minor", any person who has not attained the age of eighteen years;

    (3) "Parent", a biological parent or parents of a child, as well as, the husband of a natural mother at the time the child was conceived, or a parent or parents of a child by adoption, including both the mother and the putative father of a child. The putative father of a child shall have no legal relationship unless he, prior to the entry of a decree under sections 211.442 to 211.487, has acknowledged the child as his own by affirmatively asserting his paternity.



    431.055. The legal age at which a person becomes competent to contract in Missouri is eighteen years and any rule or provision of the common law to the contrary is hereby abrogated.

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