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Thread: I.R.R. and AWOL

  1. #1
    DatTape is offline Junior Member
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    I.R.R. and AWOL

    What is the name of your state? IL

    Just recieved a letter today saying:

    Your failure to report has placed you in violation of the Uniform Code of Military, Justice and you will soon be considered as a failure to report (FTR) to your place of duty. Contact the Mobilization Accountability Assurance Team immediately regarding your status.

    It is unfortunate that the Commander, US Army Human Resources Command - STL has to take this final action to locate you. If you fail to report to your duty station and you fail to contact the Mobilization Accountability Assurance Team by 13 April 2006 you will be considered for administrative separation under adverse conditions.



    Does this mean I will be just plain dishcarged, or does this mean I will be Dropped From Rolls (DFR), or what exactly does this mean?
  2. #2
    patriotam22 is offline Member
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    Army discharges disobedient reservists
    Service begins action to release dozens who ignored mobilization orders
    MSNBC.com
    Feb, 9th 2005

    WASHINGTON - The Army on Monday began moves to expel dozens of reserve soldiers who failed to report for duty months after being mobilized for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, in effect serving notice to hundreds of others that they could face penalties for ignoring or refusing orders to return to active duty.

    The proceedings mark a turning point in the Army’s struggle to contact, train and deploy thousands of Individual Ready Reserve soldiers, nearly half of whom have requested a delay in returning, asked to be exempt or simply ignored their orders.

    The soldiers in this category of reserve status, who have served previously on active duty but have not completed their eight-year service obligation, are different from those in the National Guard or Reserve, and they are rarely mobilized.
    Story continues below ↓ advertisement

    The Army began mobilizing them in the summer of 2004, reflecting the enormous strain it felt in providing enough soldiers for Iraq at a time when it was becoming apparent that no early withdrawal was likely.

    So far, mobilization orders have been issued for more than 5,700 IRR soldiers since mid-2004.

    The Army announced that about 80 soldiers will face review panels, known as separation boards, although the number may grow. If it is determined that they intentionally failed to obey a mobilization order, they would face one of three levels of discharge from the service: honorable, general or other-than-honorable.

    They do not face criminal charges.

    “Because of these soldiers’ disregard of their duty, the Army will initiate separation proceedings on all IRR soldiers who fail to obey mobilization orders,” the Army said in a statement explaining its decision to act.

    As of Dec. 11, the latest date for which the Army had figures, 3,954 IRR soldiers had reported for duty. In addition, more than 1,600 had been excused from duty and 463 had been sent orders but not yet reported. Of those 463, the Army has been unable to locate 383. The other 80 are the ones who now face discharge.

    Penalty for no contact
    When the Army initially found that it was facing resistance from some IRR soldiers who did not want to get back in uniform, there was talk of declaring them AWOL and pursuing criminal charges against them. But that was deemed too harsh and the Army spent many months trying to contact those who were ignoring their orders.

    In its announcement Monday, the Army said that in addition to those who have openly refused to report for duty, those who do not respond to repeated communications from the Army may face discharge proceedings.

    All of the 80 who now face discharge proceedings are enlisted soldiers, according to Lt. Col. Bryan Hilferty, an Army spokesman. It was not immediately clear, he said, how long it had been since the Army took discharge action against IRR soldiers who refused to be mobilized, but it probably has been more than 15 years.

    Of the three possible types of discharge that an IRR soldier may face in these proceedings, the most severe is “other than honorable.” While a soldier given an honorable or general discharge would continue to be eligible for payment for accrued leave, and for health benefits and burial in an Army national cemetery, those given an “other than honorable” discharge would not be.

    Two even more severe types of discharge — bad conduct and dishonorable — will not be considered in the IRR cases, the Army said.

    Involuntary policy ended
    Last November the Army started a new policy that ended the practice of involuntary callups of officers in the IRR. The policy change affects 15,000 officers who completed their eight-year military service obligation but chose to stay in the IRR. These officers can now avoid being forced to serve on active duty, but only if they resign their commission. Previously, an officer could not resign once ordered to active duty.

    The last time members of the IRR were called to active duty was 1990, when nearly 20,000 were mobilized for the Gulf War against Iraq.

    In recent years, most in the IRR had come to assume they would never be called up. But the strains of simultaneous conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have forced the Army to mobilize IRR to fill certain vacancies.

    ______________________________

    That's what it means, you are pretty much in the clear
  3. #3
    DatTape is offline Junior Member
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    I.R.R. And AWOL

    So what you are saying I >DO NOT< have to worry about going to fort sill, OK to turn myself in. And I will NOT be having an arrest warrant on me?
  4. #4
    DatTape is offline Junior Member
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    I.R.R. and AWOL

    Could somebody please answer that?
  5. #5
    patriotam22 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DatTape
    Could somebody please answer that?
    dude, freaking relax. I just showed you an article that was all over the mainstream press. How are we able to confirm/deny? We don't work for HRC or anything so do we really know, I just put down that article so you have something to reference.
  6. #6
    DatTape is offline Junior Member
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    I.R.R. And AWOL

    I just wondered because I don't want to be caught by the police!

    If I actually had to, I would turn myself in.
  7. #7
    patriotam22 is offline Member
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    well, I say that because I'm one of the 80. I got an IRR notice in 2004 and nothing's came from it EVER. I call the DFR line they have no idea who I am, I've been pulled over nothing came from it. You cannot find any instances in the media of anyone IRR being arrested or jailed or anything.
  8. #8
    SHORTY LONG is offline Senior Member
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    14 APRIL 2006

    DatTape since you are still uneasy about your situation, then contact the GI hotline at: 1-800-394-9544 and get their take on it! Shorty out!

    Quote Originally Posted by DatTape
    What is the name of your state? IL

    Just recieved a letter today saying:

    Your failure to report has placed you in violation of the Uniform Code of Military, Justice and you will soon be considered as a failure to report (FTR) to your place of duty. Contact the Mobilization Accountability Assurance Team immediately regarding your status.

    It is unfortunate that the Commander, US Army Human Resources Command - STL has to take this final action to locate you. If you fail to report to your duty station and you fail to contact the Mobilization Accountability Assurance Team by 13 April 2006 you will be considered for administrative separation under adverse conditions.



    Does this mean I will be just plain dishcarged, or does this mean I will be Dropped From Rolls (DFR), or what exactly does this mean?
  9. #9
    revere787 Guest
    i know what an " oth " is, but what is one under adverse conditons mean?
  10. #10
    armitage_vi is offline Junior Member
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    IRR and Aministrative Seperation...

    Hey Guys I'm another IRR soldier who failed to report for duty. Here's my story,

    I got out ofthe military years ago (2000) and I never thought anything of it again. I got married and had a son, then last summer I got a letter in the mail telling me I was suppose to report in 2004 for duty and failure to do so would result in severe criminal and civil penalties.

    Well I freaked out called thinking this was some kind of mistake and found out it wasn't. After that point I contacted HRC got new orders, filed for an exemption, then filed for an appeal after both were denied due to stress disorder.

    I had serious objections about this war and since the birth of my son I pretty much feel that way about all wars. I just want to be a good father and husband and that it's it.

    I came to the conclusion to stand up for my beliefs and decided that I morally could not report and partake in what is happening.

    I missed my second report date and got a call about "Administrative Seperation". At this point I contact the G.I. Rights hotline to find out what this means. Currently they are issuing Less Than Honorable discharges for IRR soldiers who refuse to comply.

    There are no Criminal charges being sent, the worse that can happen to you is be dishonorably discharged and cease having any military benefits. Both are fine by me as I've never used Veteran benefits and I my entire Army experience was when I was young and behind me.

    I feel for everyone that is in my situation, and you have to think long and hard about ourself and stand up for what you think the right thing to do is.
  11. #11
    poho is offline Junior Member
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    I am also in a similiar situation to that of Dat. I requested for my initial exemption about 6 months ago and H.R.C just now got back to me with a denial. I am now debating hiring a lawyer who specializes in IRR cases to argue my case. I collect 10% disability due to degenerative joint disease in my lower back , have about 25k+ in student loan debt that would go into default if I was snatched out of school, and I am also a full-time student that helps care for my disabled mother. Does anyone think that it would benefit me to hire a lawyer to argue my appeal?? Also, if worse comes to worse what could they do to me if I just did not show up. The only V.A. benefi that I care about is my G.I Bill but if I had to I could live w/o it.

    Thanks 4 Your tIME....
  12. #12
    Shay-Pari'e is offline Senior Member
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    Do you realize you are posting to a very OLD thread?
  13. #13
    ReallyWonder is offline Junior Member
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    I for one feel sorry for the sucker that is paying a civilian lawyer to fight away an IRR obligation notice.

    The army would have to recruit an ARMY! just to traverse globe and procedurely account for everyone thats in the IRR that no-shows. That means Ricky the Recruiter would have field places like Newark New Jersey in full combat gear ( just to survive long enough to make it to a mailbox) And then attempt to spout jargon about some service obligation.... Situations like that can end badly for lots of people.
    The army didnt even do that kind of thing in ww1,ww2, or vietnam. All the draftees from those wars if they weren't felons then they were just regular people like you who got suckered into admitting they recieved anything. The army had to pull its recrutiing stations out of some neighborhoods if I remember correctly because they were getting smashed up and burnt down and what not...

    Bottom line is anything you get in the mail is just BAIT and thats pretty much the ONLY weapon in their arsenal regarding IRR soldiers, unless you are suckered into admitting that you recieved anything..you're in the clear and can save your' lawyer money to buy a new truck or something useful.
  14. #14
    OHRoadwarrior is offline Senior Member
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    NecroPost!!!! Let it die in peace.

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