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  1. #1
    STRanch is offline Junior Member
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    Nov 2007
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    How best to grant an easement to the power co.

    I am in oklahoma. I am building a house on 96 acres and need to tie into the grid and there is currently no easements on my property. PSO (power company) will require some sort of easment and I dont want them all over the property... what would be the best way to go this? Could I survey and section off the driveway as a seperate piece of property and then sign an easment over on just this?

    Also, I am thinking about purchasing another 20 acres which DOES have an easment on it for PSO as well as others. If I were to buy this and add it into my current property would the easment on this 20 acres then cover my current property?
  2. #2
    FarmerJ is offline Senior Member
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    Ask the power co IF they can come out and tell you just where they would put poles to bring power in if they were to do so. Other wise plan on the cost of having the meter and main cut off out by the road and go underground with line that you have paid for all the way to the house or overhead if permitted on poles that you pay to have installed by a private contractor. then this way if you keep the meter out near the road the light co will have no need to have a easement all the way in.
  3. #3
    sweetsoo is offline Junior Member
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    one consideration with the above idea

    if you keep the meter at the road, then you are responsible for the lines to your property. That is not always a great idea.
  4. #4
    lizjimbo is offline Member
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    Mar 2007
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    Above ground or underground

    In some jurisdictions the power company may be required to provide service to your house at no cost if the lines are installed above ground and you pay for lines underground. Usually public service companies are going to follow the path of least resistance if they have to cover the cost. If you pay all the cost then they will probably put the lines wherever you want them. The easement will be centered about the actual construction.
  5. #5
    HomeGuru is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by STRanch View Post
    I am in oklahoma. I am building a house on 96 acres and need to tie into the grid and there is currently no easements on my property. PSO (power company) will require some sort of easment and I dont want them all over the property... what would be the best way to go this? Could I survey and section off the driveway as a seperate piece of property and then sign an easment over on just this?

    **A: only if the power co. agrees.

    ******

    Also, I am thinking about purchasing another 20 acres which DOES have an easment on it for PSO as well as others. If I were to buy this and add it into my current property would the easment on this 20 acres then cover my current property?

    **A: the answer is no.

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