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  1. #1
    randomoutburst is offline Junior Member
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    Removing possessions from the house?

    What is the name of your state? Texas.

    I'm asking this on the behalf of my boyfriend, Michael, who is 19 and going to college.
    His dad had an issue with Michael's college grades and told him that in order for him to stay in his house, Michael would have to break up with me and live at home, with no friends allowed over. Michael told his dad that he supposed he would need to move out, then. I picked him up from his house with a bag of clothes and he is now living with me.
    His dad spoke to one of Michael's friends who informed Michael that his dad has changed the locks on the house. Neither of us believe that is true. Michael has clothing, a computer, and a stereo among other things. My concern is that if he takes the rest of his possessions from the house (assuming the locks have not been changed, as Michael still has a key), his dad will try to say Michael stole things from the house. If Michael were to drive to his house while his parents aren't there and collect the rest of his belongings, and his dad raised a fuss over it once he found out, can his dad legally do anything about it?
  2. #2
    CourtClerk is offline Senior Member
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    If someone who is no longer a resident in my household (including my son) came into my house without my permission and attempted to remove things from MY home, I'd have him arrested. Period.

    Michael cannot go where he does not have permission to go. This includes his parent's home. However, since Michael has decided that he wants to be a big boy, he can go out and buy all new stuff, especially if anything he decided he wanted was attained while he was a minor.
  3. #3
    las365 is offline Senior Member
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    Did Dad buy those things for Michael? Sounds like sonny acted without thinking things through very clearly.

    Maybe you should just buy Michael a new computer, stereo and clothes and pay his tuition. Or he could get a job and pay for those things himself.
  4. #4
    randomoutburst is offline Junior Member
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    Michael bought most of the things and some of the items left at the house include school books which he purchased as well.

    I don't appreciate snide remarks when all I asked for was advice. I understand that you are entitled to your opinions and feelings about a situation like this, but please simply answer my question. I couldn't possibly give you a background on everything which is why I limited my explanation to information necessary to answer my query. Thank you.


    Edit: Also, his parents have not told him he cannot enter the home. The night I picked him up, his father was guarding the door to prevent him from leaving. This is more a matter of Michael does not want to be in a situation where his father tries to force him to stay again.
    Last edited by randomoutburst; 05-26-2008 at 04:50 PM.
  5. #5
    las365 is offline Senior Member
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    randomoutburst, I read your other thread. You are too young and have too much to deal with involving your own parental problems to take on those of someone else. I do not mean this in a snide or cruel way, but your boyfriend needs to deal with his own problems. You should not step in to try to solve them for him.

    I know you mean well, but tell Michael ask his own questions, fight his own battles, and support himself.
  6. #6
    randomoutburst is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks, but all I asked for was an answer to my question.
    I don't see why any other threads I have posted should be called into this issue...

    Could I please get amore answers and less opinion? Thank you.
  7. #7
    Texas Pooh is offline Member
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    If Michael were to drive to his house while his parents aren't there and collect the rest of his belongings, and his dad raised a fuss over it once he found out, can his dad legally do anything about it?

    Yes. First of all, it is not Michael's house. It is his father's house. Therefore, if Michael enters the house without permission, he is trespassing. It's not a matter of raising a fuss AFTER Dad finds out; it's a matter that Michael would enter the house, at all, without permission. It's no different than Michael coming to my house and entering without permission.

    If Michael wants to retrieve any belongings, he should call Dad and respectfully ask when would be a convenient time to come over and get them.

    If that doesn't work, Michael can file a claim in small claims court, and convince a judge that the items are his by producing proof of ownership (e.g., proof that he paid for the items). Otherwise, the items belong to Dad.
  8. #8
    randomoutburst is offline Junior Member
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    Texas Pooh, thank you for your response, it was helpful

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