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  1. #1
    CobraJunky is offline Junior Member
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    SS Representative Payee Report

    What is the name of your state? Connecticut

    My two daughters of 11 and 15 are receiving SS benefits as I lost my Wife to breast cancer in 2002. I just received a "Representative Payee Report" for the first time. All of the SS funds are set up in their own savings accounts with intent to be used for college eduction. Questions are;

    1. Question 3B on the form SSA-6230-OCR-SM asks how much of the funds have been used for care and support of the children. I use my regular earnings to support my two daughters and SS benefits are direct deposited to their savings accounts and the amounts remain untouched. All of the benifits are saved to their accounts. Do I risk eligibility by handling it this way and reporting the entire amount in their savings accounts? The accounts are in their names with me being the custodian of the accounts.

    2. I intend to put the funds in a Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET) fund for my daughters college education. Is this OK to do and if so, how should I report this on this report in the future?

    Thanks in advance.
  2. #2
    BL
    BL is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CobraJunky
    What is the name of your state? Connecticut

    My two daughters of 11 and 15 are receiving SS benefits as I lost my Wife to breast cancer in 2002. I just received a "Representative Payee Report" for the first time. All of the SS funds are set up in their own savings accounts with intent to be used for college eduction. Questions are;

    1. Question 3B on the form SSA-6230-OCR-SM asks how much of the funds have been used for care and support of the children. I use my regular earnings to support my two daughters and SS benefits are direct deposited to their savings accounts and the amounts remain untouched. All of the benifits are saved to their accounts. Do I risk eligibility by handling it this way and reporting the entire amount in their savings accounts? The accounts are in their names with me being the custodian of the accounts.

    2. I intend to put the funds in a Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET) fund for my daughters college education. Is this OK to do and if so, how should I report this on this report in the future?

    Thanks in advance.
    The SSI benefits are for the Purposes of the every day Child's needs .

    How on earth did they qualify If on your income you can support them ?

    Yes you are going about this the wrong way . You should be using the SSI benefits for the Children's every day Basic Needs .

    The form breaks it down .

    Put your Own money in a trust , use theirs for what is intended for . Then again they might see that as another assett .

    If SSI sees this they might cut the Benefits and make you repay .
  3. #3
    CobraJunky is offline Junior Member
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    Blonde

    According to SS, here: [url]http://www.ssa.gov/survivorplan/ifyou4.htm[/url]

    "If you are the unmarried child under 18 (up to age 19 if attending elementary or secondary school full time) of a worker who dies, you also can be eligible to receive Social Security survivor benefits."

    I suppose I'm doing things the old fashion way. My wife took a job so she could earn money to pay for our children's college education rather than put ourselves in debt and have to take out a college loan. Don't you wish everyone planned this well?

    She's dead. She paid into our SS system just like everyone else and as far as I know, there isn't in any way shape or form a minimum wage qualification against MY earnings. This isn't welfare. She paid into the system and her children are the beneficiaries until they are 18. We weren't divorced. We were happily married and worked our asses off for our children rather than ourselves. Like I said, the old fashion way.

    I resent that you infer that I'm taking entitlements that I'm not entitled to. Your tag line pretty much sums it up though.

    I'm new to the forum. Not to the planet.
  4. #4
    BL
    BL is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CobraJunky
    According to SS, here: [url]http://www.ssa.gov/survivorplan/ifyou4.htm[/url]

    "If you are the unmarried child under 18 (up to age 19 if attending elementary or secondary school full time) of a worker who dies, you also can be eligible to receive Social Security survivor benefits."

    I suppose I'm doing things the old fashion way. My wife took a job so she could earn money to pay for our children's college education rather than put ourselves in debt and have to take out a college loan. Don't you wish everyone planned this well?

    She's dead. She paid into our SS system just like everyone else and as far as I know, there isn't in any way shape or form a minimum wage qualification against MY earnings. This isn't welfare. She paid into the system and her children are the beneficiaries until they are 18. We weren't divorced. We were happily married and worked our asses off for our children rather than ourselves. Like I said, the old fashion way.

    I resent that you infer that I'm taking entitlements that I'm not entitled to. Your tag line pretty much sums it up though.

    I'm new to the forum. Not to the planet.
    I'm glad your not an alien .

    FYI : If you are the unmarried child under 18 (up to age 19 if attending elementary or secondary school full time) of a worker who dies, you also can be eligible to receive Social Security survivor benefits.

    SSI is Supplemental Security . See I have a Brother .One of his children receives SSI = supplemental Security . SSA would use a Parents income and Assets to determine if a minor child is to receive SSI benefits .

    You should have Stated Survivors Benefits .
  5. #5
    CobraJunky is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks

    I'm somewhat aware of the details of SSI but I'm pretty new to this whole thing as my wife had taken care of the family finances. So...... back to the question. I'm honestly trying to do the right thing here. Although the care and needs of my children have been provided for, it did not come directly out of their accounts funded by the SS benefits but rather my own finances. (trust me, there's nothing that resembles a surplus when all is said and done) Now I'm questioning whether it's even within guidelines to put the money into the CHET fund.
  6. #6
    BL
    BL is offline Senior Member
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    About 3.8 million children receive approximately $1.6 billion each month because one or both of their parents are disabled, retired or deceased. Those dollars help to provide the necessities of life for family members and help to make it possible for those children to complete high school. When a parent becomes disabled or dies, Social Security benefits help to stabilize the family’s financial future.

    [url]http://www.ssa.gov/ww&os3.htm[/url]

    According to this, the benefits are not intended to be put away for college .

    I'd start using it for what the Form states . For what and the amounts .
  7. #7
    bjl1105 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by CobraJunky
    What is the name of your state? Connecticut

    My two daughters of 11 and 15 are receiving SS benefits as I lost my Wife to breast cancer in 2002. I just received a "Representative Payee Report" for the first time. All of the SS funds are set up in their own savings accounts with intent to be used for college eduction. Questions are;

    1. Question 3B on the form SSA-6230-OCR-SM asks how much of the funds have been used for care and support of the children. I use my regular earnings to support my two daughters and SS benefits are direct deposited to their savings accounts and the amounts remain untouched. All of the benifits are saved to their accounts. Do I risk eligibility by handling it this way and reporting the entire amount in their savings accounts? The accounts are in their names with me being the custodian of the accounts.

    2. I intend to put the funds in a Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET) fund for my daughters college education. Is this OK to do and if so, how should I report this on this report in the future?

    Thanks in advance.
    1.You do not risk losing or jeopardizing their benefits by conserving their funds. SSA actually directs you to conserve excess monies.
    2. Check the link below to determine the proper financial vehicle for conserved funds.

    Here is the direct link to SSA's "Conserved Funds policy". Generally, as long as the children's needs are being met, it is ok to conserve funds. However, you cannot withhold those monies from the children once they are 18. Visit the website. It is pretty clear.
    [url]http://policy.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0200603001[/url]

    from the site "Title II (SSA)and title XVI (SSI)benefits must be used for the immediate or reasonably foreseeable needs of the beneficiary. Any remaining benefits must be conserved or invested for the beneficiary" and
    "Encourage payees to place accumulated funds in excess of $500 in interest-yielding investments. The beneficiary's right to use conserved benefits may not be made contingent upon his or her special use of it. For example, a payee may not conserve funds for a beneficiary specifically earmarked to pay for a college education and withhold the funds if the beneficiary later decides not to attend college. "
    One way to avoid the "conserved funds issue" is to spend their benefits on a monthly basis for food, clothing, shelter (as is intended) etc and bank YOUR contributions into a custodial account on their behalf. So, the conserved funds are YOURS and dont need to be reported on the Rep. Payee Accounting report. Either way, you are within the guidelines of SSA rules. Hope this helps.

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