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  1. #1
    mdak is offline Junior Member
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    Jul 2011
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    Dog Grooming liability issue

    What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Florida

    A friend of mine was bathing a dog. While he was bathing the dog it jumped and ended up breaking one of its hind legs. He is an independent contractor that rents space in the grooming shop. He spoke to the owners of the dog and agreed to pay the vet bill. He has been paying the vet bill, but I recently contacted the vet office and they notified me that the owner of the dog is not following the vets instructions and the process of healing is being prolonged, thus demanding more vet visits.
    My question is:
    How far does the injury liability run and what does he need to do limit the damages?

    Thanks for your time.What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)?
  2. #2
    justalayman is offline Senior Member
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    I wouldn't have been sure there was any liability to begin with without more information.

    so, if there was no actual liability, they can stop paying anytime they want.

    If the owner is causing injury to the dog causing additional treatment, your friend would not be liable for that BUT figuring out what is actually treatment from the original injury or injury causing prolonged treatment may be difficult to separate. Since they appear to be friendly enough with the vet, if it was me, I would find out about how much it should have cost if the owner didn't refuse to follow directions and stop my contribution at that point.
  3. #3
    stealth2 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdak View Post
    What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Florida

    A friend of mine was bathing a dog. While he was bathing the dog it jumped and ended up breaking one of its hind legs. He is an independent contractor that rents space in the grooming shop. He spoke to the owners of the dog and agreed to pay the vet bill. He has been paying the vet bill, but I recently contacted the vet office and they notified me that the owner of the dog is not following the vets instructions and the process of healing is being prolonged, thus demanding more vet visits.
    My question is:
    How far does the injury liability run and what does he need to do limit the damages?

    Thanks for your time.What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)?
    Why would you be calling, instead of your friend?
  4. #4
    mdak is offline Junior Member
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    Jul 2011
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    I was calling instead of my friend because he is a scared twenty-something who is very intimidated by the situation. I however, was very suspicious of how long it was taking for the dog to heal. Not to mention I'm on a more friendly basis with the vet.

    Thank you for all your replies.

    However, we were hoping to resolve this without having to shift all the problems on the business owner as that could have serious consequences for the bather.

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