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auto body shop fraud

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#1
Texas

Took my car to a Honda ProFirst body shop to get a replacement door after a minor collision. Insurance wanted me to replace with a refurbished door, but I paid extra out of pocket to have a new door instead. Everything looked fine when I picked up the car, but after closer inspection, I believe that the door is refurbished and not new as promised. There is a stain on the interior fabric, random scratches on the plastic areas of the door, etc. I'm planning to take my car to the dealer to confirm that the door is refurbished, but I'm not sure what I should do after that.

Questions:
1. If the shop denies that the door is refurbished, what are my options? Small claims court? File a complaint with the attorney general?

2. I want a new door, but I'm not sure if I trust them to redo the repair again. Ideally, I would like a different shop or the dealer to install a new door at the body shop's expense. What is the likelihood that the repair shop will agree to this?

Thank you very much in advance.
 
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Just Blue

Senior Member
#2
Texas

Took my car to a Honda ProFirst body shop to get a replacement door after a minor collision. Insurance wanted me to replace with a refurbished door, but I paid extra out of pocket to have a new door instead. Everything looked fine when I picked up the car today, but after closer inspection, I believe that the door is refurbished and not new as promised. There is a stain on the interior fabric, random scratches on the plastic areas of the door, and an old sticker with what I think is a crossed out VIN. I'm planning to take my car to the dealer to confirm that the door is refurbished, but I'm not sure what I should do after that.

Questions:
1. If the shop denies that the door is refurbished, what are my options? Small claims court? File a complaint with the attorney general?

2. I want a new door, but I'm not sure if I trust them to redo the repair again. Ideally, I would like a different shop or the dealer to install a new door at the body shop's expense. What is the likelihood that the repair shop will agree to this?

Thank you very much in advance.
What year is your car?
 
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#5
I paid extra out of pocket to have a new door instead.
Did your written estimate say new door?
Does your invoice say new door?

Let's have you answer those two questions before we spend any more time on this. Understand that "I told" or "I was told" isn't going to be helpful.
 
#8
Thank you for the replies.
Yes, both the estimate and invoice state that the parts are OEM.

Got a second opinion from a different body shop. They said that the repair was not great (panels not perfectly aligned, some rattling noises), and that it would not be possible to tell if the part was refurbished. I am planning to contact my insurance agent and see where it goes from there.
 
#9
Thank you for the replies.
Yes, both the estimate and invoice state that the parts are OEM.
What does OEM mean? Does it mean that the door is a the same door that Honda used when your car was built in 2013, and not a door manufactured by some other company. Or does it mean that it is a brand new door, never been used before, that Honda has just had sitting ca in a warehouse, waiting for you to need a door? How long do you think Honda should keep a door in stock, just in case someone needs one 5 or 6, or more, years later, just in case?

OEM basically means its the same part that came with your car, not aftermarket parts made by different companies.
 

Litigator22

Well-known member
#12
The word "furbish" is a transitive verb meaning to polish, sour or clean to brightness. The term "refurbish" means to renovate or return something to look like new, or return it to a new like condition. Thus presupposing that the finished object is not new.

So, if you paid for a new door rather than one made to look like new, then you are entitled to have the door replaced with a new item. Assuming that the door was replaced, and the original not repaired, the records of the repair shop should reveal whether it was new or used.

But you'll need some convincing evidence that the replacement is a "refurbished" door and you certainly can't do so through the separate source mentioned that apparently is unable, or simply refuses to make the distinction.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
#13
The word "furbish" is a transitive verb meaning to polish, sour or clean to brightness. The term "refurbish" means to renovate or return something to look like new, or return it to a new like condition. Thus presupposing that the finished object is not new.

So, if you paid for a new door rather than one made to look like new, then you are entitled to have the door replaced with a new item. Assuming that the door was replaced, and the original not repaired, the records of the repair shop should reveal whether it was new or used.

But you'll need some convincing evidence that the replacement is a "refurbished" door and you certainly can't do so through the separate source mentioned that apparently is unable, or simply refuses to make the distinction.
English 101. :p
 
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