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Blood Borne Exposure!

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jrawson78

New member
I currently live in Vermont. I work at a hospital. I was recently exposed to a patients blood and am not having to take a harsh anti viralogic medication due to the patients blood not being taken as a base. I was told that it was being drawn when I had to be admitted for blood testing myself. I have several questions and need legal advice on this issue. Is anyone able to assist me?
 


helpdesk

Junior Member
generally mere exposure to unidentified or benign substances are not considered as injuries under workers compensation statutes.
you would have to show that the exposure to the particular blood in question had the potential to cause you harm and that you in fact had that necessary contact. and further that you have been harmed to such an extent that you require treatment or may have resulting disability. evidence to those conditions should be in the form of medical opinions. without such a chain of causality you would not be eligible for workers compensation benefits. generally preventative care is not covered by workers comp; only treatment subsequent to "injury".
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
A similar issue is happening at the University hospital where I now work. A patient with measles came in as a walk-in through the ER and the hospital is now attempting to notify all patients that were present in the ER during the time of the infected child's presence that they may have been exposed. But, they have not done anything similar for staff. There is a great deal of consternation by staff, and unclear direction by hospital admin. as to whether this exposure qualifies for mandatory reporting pursuant to worker's compensation. To be safe, we (the law enforcement side) reported the exposure, just in case - and to preserve the claim should any of our people become infected.
 

helpdesk

Junior Member
Good advice. For any “ potential “ claim a preliminary report only can make it much easier to file a formal claim for benefits later. Make detailed written notes of the incident; including names, times, quotes, etc. So if it later becomes necessary to file a claim or initiate an investigation there is accurate information as a starting point.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I currently live in Vermont. I work at a hospital. I was recently exposed to a patients blood and am not having to take a harsh anti viralogic medication due to the patients blood not being taken as a base. I was told that it was being drawn when I had to be admitted for blood testing myself. I have several questions and need legal advice on this issue. Is anyone able to assist me?
To what do you fear you were you exposed?

Here is a link to the Vermont laws on communicable diseases:
 
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