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California 6 month waiting period

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stealth2

Under the Radar Member
#2
Perhaps you'd get a better response if you give a bit more information or context. We aren't all aware of what every form in every state might mean, and no one is going to spend time looking it all up. Thanks.
 

stealth2

Under the Radar Member
#4
6 month waiting period for what? No one here can operate in a vacuum. It's like asking "is this normal for a 6 mo old?" without ever telling what "this" is...
 
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not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
#5
6 month waiting period for what? No one here can operate in a vacuum. It's like asking "is this normal for a 6 mo old?" without ever telling what "this" is...
Apparently California has a 6 month "cooling off" period for divorces after the respondent has been served with divorce papers. No final decrees until (at least) 6 months after filing.

I think that OP is concerned that the scheduled date for the judgement is before those 6 months are up.
 
#6
Apparently California has a 6 month "cooling off" period for divorces after the respondent has been served with divorce papers. No final decrees until (at least) 6 months after filing.

I think that OP is concerned that the scheduled date for the judgement is before those 6 months are up.
Apparently California has a 6 month "cooling off" period for divorces after the respondent has been served with divorce papers. No final decrees until (at least) 6 months after filing.

I think that OP is concerned that the scheduled date for the judgement is before those 6 months are up.
Yes that is my concern. The decree is finalized before the 6 months
 
#7
California has a 6 month "cooling off" period for divorces after the respondent has been served with divorce papers. No final decrees until (at least) 6 months after filing.
 
#11
2339.
(a) Subject to subdivision (b) and to Sections 2340 to 2344, inclusive, no judgment of dissolution is final for the purpose of terminating the marriage relationship of the parties until six months have expired from the date of service of a copy of summons and petition or the date of appearance of the respondent, whichever occurs first.
(b) The court may extend the six-month period described in subdivision (a) for good cause shown.
(Enacted by Stats. 1992, Ch. 162, Sec. 10. Operative January 1, 1994.)


The divorce is not “official” until at least 6 months after the respondent has been served. The law is not waivable or optional by the courts.
 
#12
Did you look at the date in the box on the fl 190 where it says:


Statement in this box applies only to judgment of dissolution.? That is where they put the effective date
 
#13
What is your concern anyway? The only real issue involved being that you cannot get married prior to that date. Marriages entered into prior to that date would be invalid. Are you planning on getting married very very soon?
 
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