• FreeAdvice has a new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, effective May 25, 2018.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our Terms of Service and use of cookies.

California wedding approval

Accident - Bankruptcy - Criminal Law / DUI - Business - Consumer - Employment - Family - Immigration - Real Estate - Tax - Traffic - Wills   Please click a topic or scroll down for more.

tranquility

Senior Member
What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? CA

I am going to officiate at my sister's wedding. California law is...flexible.

I was already a certificated member of the universal life church because of silly tax law issues from decades ago. Never used it for any reason but a story, but here we are.

I have three options. One, just give the ceremony. I have a certificate and all that.

Two, I can get a re-up with some online organization that better fits my religious theory. At least that would have a modern certificate. I think the cost is from $20-40 dollars..

Third, I can get a temporary appointment as a county representative. The cost is between $100-200 and a promise to not say religious things. I will violate that promise in theory, but can say things all legal like.

Is there a better legal path? Does anyone have any horrible stories from any of the choices? Are there any recommendations?
 


FlyingRon

Senior Member
California should accept your declaration that you are a minister of ULC. Registration isn't required in California, but sometimes some certification or letter of good standing (which the ULC will just issue to you) will convince them more than just your assertion that you are a minister. It would behoove you to contact the county where you will be filing the marriage certificate in advance to make sure they acknowledge your ability to solmenize marriages in that jurisdiciton.

This is all in the 400 sections of the Family Code.
 

tranquility

Senior Member
California should accept your declaration that you are a minister of ULC. Registration isn't required in California, but sometimes some certification or letter of good standing (which the ULC will just issue to you) will convince them more than just your assertion that you are a minister. It would behoove you to contact the county where you will be filing the marriage certificate in advance to make sure they acknowledge your ability to solmenize marriages in that jurisdiciton.

This is all in the 400 sections of the Family Code.
Thank you. I have read the code and agree my old certificate is enough under the law. As to if they (my sworn religion) will give an additional certificate after 30 years, I am less certain.

Realistically, I'm really asking if anyone with a smidgen of claim has ever had a problem with a signature on the license. I don't see appellate cases out there that show such a problem. I'm just supposing.
 

Sponsored Ad

Top