• FreeAdvice has a new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, effective May 25, 2018.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our Terms of Service and use of cookies.

Can a dentist charge more than the Estimate of Benefits provided after services were rendered?

Accident - Bankruptcy - Criminal Law / DUI - Business - Consumer - Employment - Family - Immigration - Real Estate - Tax - Traffic - Wills   Please click a topic or scroll down for more.



Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Yes, but rarely is that care free. It may be at no cost to the patient, but the hospital gets paid. I'm sure there may be some exceptions, but they are definitely exceptions and not the norm.
That depends on the hospital. You are lumping them all together as though they all operate on the same model. They don't. First, there are three general groups of hospitals. Not in any particular order, those are government owned and operated hospitals, private tax exempt hospitals that provide charitable care to those who cannot afford it (which may be free or reduced cost care), and the for profit corporate hospitals. The first two provide much more reduced cost and free care (to the patient) than the third. And those providing that free or subsidized care don't end up getting paid for the costs they waive. Rather, either taxes (in the case of government hospitals) or donations (in the case of charitable hospitals) along with higher fees for those who can pay (for both types of hospitals) cover the gap.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
That depends on the hospital. You are lumping them all together as though they all operate on the same model.
I'm not lumping them together. I understand that there are different "models" and I am allowing for that.
And those providing that free or subsidized care don't end up getting paid for the costs they waive. Rather, either taxes (in the case of government hospitals) or donations (in the case of charitable hospitals) along with higher fees for those who can pay (for both types of hospitals) cover the gap.
Exactly - they get paid. Maybe not by the patient...but they do get paid. That's the point I was making.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
I'm not lumping them together. I understand that there are different "models" and I am allowing for that.

Exactly - they get paid. Maybe not by the patient...but they do get paid. That's the point I was making.
I think that there is actually a difference between getting paid, and having the costs covered by the hospital itself through non directed donations or taxes. When a vet goes to a VA hospital the government does not send a specific check to cover his fees. The costs of providing his care are covered through a budget given to the VA hospital by the government.

When someone donates to a charity, unless its a directed donation to build a new wing or something like that, the donation is going to go into the pot to help cover all of the costs of running the hospital, including patient care.
 

quincy

Senior Member
What does this statement have to do with my dental insurance question?
Sorry, Beth.

A new member to the forum stopped by and added a comment to your thread that had nothing at all to do with your dental insurance question. This resulted in your thread taking a bit of a detour.

Did you have more to add? Have you heard back from your insurer?
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
I think that there is actually a difference between getting paid, and having the costs covered by the hospital itself through non directed donations or taxes. When a vet goes to a VA hospital the government does not send a specific check to cover his fees. The costs of providing his care are covered through a budget given to the VA hospital by the government.

When someone donates to a charity, unless its a directed donation to build a new wing or something like that, the donation is going to go into the pot to help cover all of the costs of running the hospital, including patient care.
Yep - VA would fall under one of "exceptions" that I mentioned.

I disagree that there is a difference between getting paid and having the costs covered by donations. Either way, the hospital covers its costs with money paid to them. The services are not "free".


EDIT: My apologies to BethG66 - I won't post any further about this off-topic matter.
 

Find the Right Lawyer for Your Legal Issue!

Fast, Free, and Confidential
data-ad-format="auto">
Top