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Can I make changes to the writ after getting it warranted but not served?

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SJ941

New member
#1
What is the name of your state? Scotland, United Kingdom

Can I make changes to my initial writ after getting it warranted but not served in an Ordinary Procedure case of the Sheriff court of Scotland, United Kingdom?
 


quincy

Senior Member
#4
Oh okay. Is that allowed in New York, USA?
Why?

What is true for New York, USA, will not necessarily be true in Scotland, U.K.

I suggest you get an answer to your question from a legal professional in Scotland and do not confuse yourself unnecessarily with U.S. law.

Good luck.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
#5
We don't have "ordinary procedure cases" nor "sheriff's courts" in NY. In fact, your question is not even extrapolated into the UK in general, let alone to the US.
 

SJ941

New member
#6
Flyingron, you said:

''even extrapolated into the UK in general, let alone to the US. ''

Scotland is part of the UK. How is my question not extrapolated into the UK?

Permission to take your case from a smaller court to a higher court seems to be a norm all around the world. Isn't this statement correct?
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
#7
I said "extrapolated to the UK in general."

While Scotland is part of the UK, the terms mentioned do not exist in England or Wales or Northern Ireland, so they do not extend to the UK in general, only to Scotland. Sorry, I presumed that Scotland being part of the UK also spoke the Queen's English.

Permission to take your case from a smaller court to a higher court seems to be a norm all around the world. Isn't this statement correct?
Not universally true, and the details are completely different as they very much depend on what sort of case you are talking about and what court you are appealing from.
 
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