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Can I sue a big restaurant corporation?

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John3232

New member
What is the name of your state? Georgia
I just recently turned 18. I work in a restaurant which is one of hundreds. When I was 16/17 and still in school they use to work me over 5 hours without breaks. The manager has said sexual things about my girlfriend to me. When working a job they often make you do something else and you do not get paid for it. Even when I'm clocked out and let's say leaving I'll be asked to do things. I quit my day school for this job and it's a very uncomfortable environment. Do I have a case against them? I thought about threatening them with going to the news and exposing them.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
What is the name of your state? Georgia
I just recently turned 18. I work in a restaurant which is one of hundreds. When I was 16/17 and still in school they use to work me over 5 hours without breaks. The manager has said sexual things about my girlfriend to me. When working a job they often make you do something else and you do not get paid for it. Even when I'm clocked out and let's say leaving I'll be asked to do things. I quit my day school for this job and it's a very uncomfortable environment. Do I have a case against them? I thought about threatening them with going to the news and exposing them.
Report your issues to HR.
 

PayrollHRGuy

Senior Member
But what they did is illegal. I deserve compensation. HR does nothing. They can't fix the past.
1. 5 hours without a break was not illegal as far as I can tell.

2. You should, of course, be paid for all hours worked.

3. The sexual talk about your GF may have created a hostile workplace environment.

You need to be able to document #2.

You should certainly speak to HR and allow the employer to deal with #3 before a claim is filed.
 

quincy

Senior Member
What is the name of your state? Georgia
I just recently turned 18. I work in a restaurant which is one of hundreds. When I was 16/17 and still in school they use to work me over 5 hours without breaks. The manager has said sexual things about my girlfriend to me. When working a job they often make you do something else and you do not get paid for it. Even when I'm clocked out and let's say leaving I'll be asked to do things. I quit my day school for this job and it's a very uncomfortable environment. Do I have a case against them? I thought about threatening them with going to the news and exposing them.
The first step any employee should take to resolving a problem in a workplace is to let the employer know that there IS a problem.

The employer cannot fix a problem that it doesn’t know exists.

I am sorry to hear you dropped out of school. I hope you are working on a GED. Although there are certainly jobs for high school dropouts, the types of jobs available are often limited in pay and possibility for advancement.
 

Pinkie39

Member
What Quincy wrote.

I dropped out of high school in the 11th grade, at 17, and got my GED at 18. I earned a bachelor's degree at 29, as a parent with a full time job. I speak from experience that it's much easier to further your education when you are young, especially before you have kids.

There are many more high school completion programs these days than when I was a teenager. If you have dropped out, and there is a community college in your area, please check with them to see what programs they offer for adults without high school diplomas. Many offer free programs to help adults get GEDs as well as job training and certifications at the same time.

As for your job situation, I worked at fast food restaurants as a teenager/young adult. I also have a young adult child and a teen myself, who have worked at part time minimum wage jobs.

Sadly, based on our experiences, I think it's not unusual for many of those types of employers to flaunt labor laws and take advantage of young employees who they think don't know any better.

If you get the education and skills to get better jobs, you won't have to be dependent on those types of employers.
 
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cbg

I'm a Northern Girl
The first thing any overseeing agency is going to ask you is, What steps did you take to fix the problem? What internal remedies did you pursue?

If the answer is, "None, I just quit", the likelihood is that they will shake their heads and say, "Wrong move on your part, pal."

Neither Georgia nor Federal law has any requirements for breaks for minors 16 and 17 years old; nor is there a limit on how many hours 16 and 17 year olds can be required to work.
 

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