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ciarapickett

New member
Hello! My name is Ciara I am from Louisiana, I bank currently where my employers daughter-in-law works. This daughter in law has proceeded to tell my employer, district manager and other employees how much money is in my bank account. I have had no transactions w/ this teller which would give her the chance to look at my account? What actions should I take now?
 


Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Hello! My name is Ciara I am from Louisiana, I bank currently where my employers daughter-in-law works. This daughter in law has proceeded to tell my employer, district manager and other employees how much money is in my bank account. I have had no transactions w/ this teller which would give her the chance to look at my account? What actions should I take now?
And when you told the bank president or branch manager what the teller had done, what did he/she say would be done about it? If you haven't complained to the bank management yet, that really should be your first step. Prepare for that by looking at your bank's privacy policy. Federal law requires every financial institution to have one and to make it available to customers. It will likely say that the disclosures the bank can make are limited and likely don't cover the disclosures the teller made. If that's the case, point out to the bank officials that the teller's disclosures violated the privacy policy and ask what the bank will do about it.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Hello! My name is Ciara I am from Louisiana, I bank currently where my employers daughter-in-law works. This daughter in law has proceeded to tell my employer, district manager and other employees how much money is in my bank account. I have had no transactions w/ this teller which would give her the chance to look at my account? What actions should I take now?
How did you learn that your employer's daughter-in-law told people about your bank account?
 

mrmunchkins4

Active Member
I highly suggest you research related information / privacy laws and banking regulations in Louisana and federal statues. A lot of times, acts passed by legislation include a clause that allows recovery for attorney fees, pain and suffering, and even punitive damages for cause of action (proof your privacy was violated) etc.

If you could list off a bunch of facts that would show to an average individual probable cause, I would suggest contacting an attorney. Matters like these are complex and can get incredibly difficult.

Just know, a LOT of lawyers take contingency fee agreements. Go off a directory in the state of Louisiana, grab a huge list of emails and state your case, and any non-sensitive information to proof of your claim. A lawyer may be interested in your case.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I highly suggest you research related information / privacy laws and banking regulations in Louisana and federal statues. A lot of times, acts passed by legislation include a clause that allows recovery for attorney fees, pain and suffering, and even punitive damages for cause of action (proof your privacy was violated) etc.

If you could list off a bunch of facts that would show to an average individual probable cause, I would suggest contacting an attorney. Matters like these are complex and can get incredibly difficult.

Just know, a LOT of lawyers take contingency fee agreements. Go off a directory in the state of Louisiana, grab a huge list of emails and state your case, and any non-sensitive information to proof of your claim. A lawyer may be interested in your case.
Based on what is described by Ciara, an attorney is unlikely to offer a contingency fee agreement - and attorney fees, pain and suffering, and punitive damages are highly unlikely.

I suspect the most that Ciara can expect is for the teller to be fired.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
A lot of times, acts passed by legislation include a clause that allows recovery for attorney fees, pain and suffering, and even punitive damages for cause of action (proof your privacy was violated) etc.
Such is not the case for situation described by the OP.

If you could list off a bunch of facts that would show to an average individual probable cause, I would suggest contacting an attorney.
Probable cause is a criminal law concept and does not apply here. The problem for the OP is that there is nothing to pursue if the OP has not suffered any actual damages from the teller's actions.

Just know, a LOT of lawyers take contingency fee agreements. Go off a directory in the state of Louisiana, grab a huge list of emails and state your case, and any non-sensitive information to proof of your claim. A lawyer may be interested in your case.
Spamming a whole bunch of law firms with e-mail is not a terribly effective way to find a lawyer. Many firms, mine included, simply trash such e-mails. If you want to find out if you have a case and if you do whether the attorney would be interested in taking it then the best way to do that is call for an appointment and meet with the attorney.
 

mrmunchkins4

Active Member
Such is not the case for situation described by the OP.



Probable cause is a criminal law concept and does not apply here. The problem for the OP is that there is nothing to pursue if the OP has not suffered any actual damages from the teller's actions.



Spamming a whole bunch of law firms with e-mail is not a terribly effective way to find a lawyer. Many firms, mine included, simply trash such e-mails. If you want to find out if you have a case and if you do whether the attorney would be interested in taking it then the best way to do that is call for an appointment and meet with the attorney.
I agree. Probable cause puts a reasonable person to investigate further on whether to prusue a case, but it has no merit in civil cases. It's been important for me in terms of whether I wanted to further investigate and decide to take a matter to small claims or not. I should have put more context, my bad; and as I said, some statues, for example, data driver's privacy protection act, allow punitive damages to be recovered in violations.

Spamming a whole bunch of law firms with e-mail is not a terribly effective way to find a lawyer. Many firms, mine included, simply trash such e-mails. If you want to find out if you have a case and if you do whether the attorney would be interested in taking it then the best way to do that is call for an appointment and meet with the attorney.
I disagree there. I have used this option a good amount of times. It's helped build criteria of lawyers who agreed to my fee cap, and service terms, and I've had yet to run into a problem with working with such lawyers in the wayy past.

mrmunchkins has a posting history on this forum that is worth a review.
Not really. But alright.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I disagree there. When I've normally done and intiated this behavior, I had built a criteria of lawyers who agreed to my fee cap and worked well with (contractual lawyer).


Not really. But alright.
Your experience in sending emails to several attorneys is not the best way to find an attorney. The emails will either not be read or will be trashed.
 

mrmunchkins4

Active Member
Your experience in sending emails to several attorneys is not the best way to find an attorney. The emails will either not be read or will be trashed.
I disagree based off my prior experiernce. But every area has different set of cirucmstances. Regardless, let's hope OP gets something positive out of this.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
Based on what is described by Ciara, an attorney is unlikely to offer a contingency fee agreement - and attorney fees, pain and suffering, and punitive damages are highly unlikely.

I suspect the most that Ciara can expect is for the teller to be fired.
Sadly, since the teller is her boss's daughter in law, getting the teller in any kind of trouble is likely to cause Clara significant trouble as well.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Sadly, since the teller is her boss's daughter in law, getting the teller in any kind of trouble is likely to cause Clara significant trouble as well.
True. But it doesn't sound as if there is a relationship worth saving. And the firing is probably the most she should expect without demonstrable damages.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
Spamming a whole bunch of law firms with e-mail is not a terribly effective way to find a lawyer. Many firms, mine included, simply trash such e-mails. If you want to find out if you have a case and if you do whether the attorney would be interested in taking it then the best way to do that is call for an appointment and meet with the attorney.
Correction: Spamming a whole bunch of law firms with e-mail is not a terribly effective way to find an experienced, reputable lawyer.

People desperate for business (either due to lack of track record or poor track record) might respond.
People who are unreputable (think "ambulance chasers") might respond.

Munchkin person might be satisfied with such lawyers. I prefer someone competent.
 

Dandy Don

Senior Member
Don't waste your time trying to penalize someone who violated your privacy. You have not been sigificantly damaged by her disclosure.

Close that account and open up a new account at a different bank.
 
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