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County Code Enforcement

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#17
I'm sure the OP hopes that is what closer inspection will reveal. But it certainly sounds like closer inspection didn't reveal that to the inspector when he entered the house to look at it.
So here is the real deal - the electrical in question was already inside the downstairs wall. The wiring had gotten wet in the past (before I bought home), it was power to receptacles on 14/2 wiring. I left the boxes, pulled the old wire and installed 12/2 and new receptacles. Should I just pull it all out before he comes back or is it mute point since he has seen it, unintentionally.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
#18
SMH
It helps if you give us the real story when you post.

If the wiring was done according to code, then you will just need to get a permit and have it signed off. If the wiring is not up to code, then you'll need to fix or remove it.
 

HRZ

Senior Member
#19
that gets pretty grey and depends on local views ...around me a homeowner could make all sorts of " repairs " wo a permit on his own home ...then again putting in a new GFCI might require a permit and a license ...." depends " ...and this is sometimes an area where being cooperative and understanding of inspectors role works out OK.

To me replacing some wet wiring and outlets is a minor repair . Locally one might get into a bigger fuss if wet drywall was not replaced to a good distance above wet area.

IF your panel box is a code disaster ....be extra smart to visit City Hall first and resolve minor wiring repairs ...if possible ...iThe last rats nest of a panel box I got involved with was about $5500 to redo to code once somebody opened up Pandora's box )
 
#20
that gets pretty grey and depends on local views ...around me a homeowner could make all sorts of " repairs " wo a permit on his own home ...then again putting in a new GFCI might require a permit and a license ...." depends " ...and this is sometimes an area where being cooperative and understanding of inspectors role works out OK.

To me replacing some wet wiring and outlets is a minor repair . Locally one might get into a bigger fuss if wet drywall was not replaced to a good distance above wet area.

IF your panel box is a code disaster ....be extra smart to visit City Hall first and resolve minor wiring repairs ...if possible ...iThe last rats nest of a panel box I got involved with was about $5500 to redo to code once somebody opened up Pandora's box )
The work I did is in code. I replaced 14/2 wiring on a receptacle circuit with proper 12/2. All grounds are connected and only went to panel box for that one line.
 

xylene

Senior Member
#21
Many codes require work to be verified or done by a licensed Master Electrician.

I think you need to start realizing that the corners you cut are going to cost you quite a bit.
 
#23
The inspector is free to ask to see anything. He doesn't need probable cause or a reason. Now if you had refused to allow him access, he'd likely had to get an administrative search warrant in your state which would require some semblance of probable cause. Of course, the fact you've made unpermitted exterior changes, opens up a whole can of worms there.
The constitution and basic property rights say you are wrong. I would be asking what he was licensed or certified to inspect. You need to look up the state and local regulations as to what his job is. There are very specific regulations about how inspections are to be conducted so that they are standard throughout the US. They must have probable cause or permission to inspect everything. If he wants to inspect something other than the deck, he must provide advance notice of the need where you have the right to deny access at any time. he must then get a court order to search. The reason they sidestep this is because courts will not grant them access to any private property without cause.

Seeing double doors is not cause to search, which is why he is trying to convince you to give him permission to inspect further.

It is like "you have a right to remain silent", what they try and convince you of is that they will assume you guilty if you don't talk without a lawyer. They always say "what do you have to hide?" when in fact you are protecting yourself from being railroaded.

You gave him permission to enter your back yard, not your home.
 

quincy

Senior Member
#28
ho

how is 2018 dead?
People post here with new questions daily. We respond to these new questions daily.

Any thread where the original poster is no longer around - where his questions were answered and he has asked no other questions - is an old thread and should be left in the archives.

If you have questions on code enforcement, please start your own thread.

Thanks.
 
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