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Do I have to carry the same liability limits on my car insurance policy that my landlord has on their homeowners policy?

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hulingsd

Member
State of Georgia. I live in a rental apartment on my landlord s property. It s an above garage mother in law suite and is not connected to their house, but is on the same property. I ve been notified by my landlord that I need to provide proof that I ve increased my auto policy liability limits to match her coverage of $500,000 because I live on the property. This doesn t make sense to me because I don t have $500k in assets to protect (if I did, I probably wouldn t be renting) and I don t see how if I get in an accident, she could get sued? We aren t family and have no ties except for the fact that I rent on her property. It s an extra $1000 on my premium and if it s legitimate, I ll do it. However, I get the impression that she s lying about having tenants to avoid her own homeowners insurance increasing and if that s the case, I don t feel that I should foot the bill. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 


LdiJ

Senior Member
That makes absolutely no sense to me at all. I do not even see how she would benefit from you having higher auto insurance coverage. Her assets are not at risk if you have a car accident.
 

hulingsd

Member
This is what everyone else is saying. I've asked several people, even called my own insurance company and they are confused. I just spoke with her broker and she yelled at me and insisted that because I'm on the property anyone who wanted to sue me could come after her property because "lawyers have their way of getting their money" I feel like I'm being scammed.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
This is what everyone else is saying. I've asked several people, even called my own insurance company and they are confused. I just spoke with her broker and she yelled at me and insisted that because I'm on the property anyone who wanted to sue me could come after her property because "lawyers have their way of getting their money" I feel like I'm being scammed.
Yes, you are being scammed, or your landlord is being scammed by her insurance agency. Either way, don't agree to do it.
 

adjusterjack

Senior Member
This is what everyone else is saying. I've asked several people, even called my own insurance company and they are confused. I just spoke with her broker and she yelled at me and insisted that because I'm on the property anyone who wanted to sue me could come after her property because "lawyers have their way of getting their money" I feel like I'm being scammed.
There's no question that the people telling you this are idiots.

However, what does your lease say about it? If you have a written lease of a particular duration and it requires your auto insurance limits to match her homeowner limits then you are in breach of contract if you don't comply and can be evicted. If the lease doesn't require it then you don't have to do it.

If you are on a month to month tenancy (tenant at will) and don't comply, the LL can terminate your tenancy with 60 days notice.


You might want to consider finding another place to live lest there be more craziness in your future. You only have to give 30 days notice.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Yes, you are being scammed, or your landlord is being scammed by her insurance agency. Either way, don't agree to do it.
I agree with your advice to not agree to it, but I'm wondering how the OP is being scammed...or the LL for that matter. Not meant as snarky - I just don't see how this is a scam as opposed to just a clueless bunch of folks.

Ok, I can see the LL being scammed in to buying more insurance to supposedly cover the OP's lower level, but that still doesn't mean the OP is being scammed.
 

hulingsd

Member
There's no question that the people telling you this are idiots.

However, what does your lease say about it? If you have a written lease of a particular duration and it requires your auto insurance limits to match her homeowner limits then you are in breach of contract if you don't comply and can be evicted. If the lease doesn't require it then you don't have to do it.

If you are on a month to month tenancy (tenant at will) and don't comply, the LL can terminate your tenancy with 60 days notice.


You might want to consider finding another place to live lest there be more craziness in your future. You only have to give 30 days notice.
Thank you! I have already started looking because I don't want the drama or conflict. It is not in my lease. I've been here for 3 years and this is the first issue we've ever had. It's sad really, she should be more affirmative with her insurance company if you ask me. I'm not the smartest person, but before I fork out an extra $500 every 6 months I want to know why. Before she loses an excellent tenant, she should want to understand the same. Anyway, neither here nor there. I'll be moving. I'm on a month to month basis at this point and will hopefully find something in the next 3 weeks so that I can be out by July 1st.

I appreciate you all helping me out.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Thank you! I have already started looking because I don't want the drama or conflict. It is not in my lease. I've been here for 3 years and this is the first issue we've ever had. It's sad really, she should be more affirmative with her insurance company if you ask me. I'm not the smartest person, but before I fork out an extra $500 every 6 months I want to know why. Before she loses an excellent tenant, she should want to understand the same. Anyway, neither here nor there. I'll be moving. I'm on a month to month basis at this point and will hopefully find something in the next 3 weeks so that I can be out by July 1st.

I appreciate you all helping me out.
If you're month-to-month, you have to give proper notice, which is 30 days in GA. If you give notice now, you're going to owe rent for July.
 

hulingsd

Member
Yes, I would give notice and pay through July. Or August if need be. Definitely not trying to do her wrong by any means. Thank you
 

hulingsd

Member
Who to you think will be sued if you run over a neighborhood kid playing in the driveway. (Hint: Everyone)
Valid point. I still don't see how she could be sued for my negligence. If this were the case, people wouldn't rent property (ever). Can you elaborate? Not that I plan on staying here (or running over neighborhood kids), but I'd like to understand how if I hit someone on her property her home could be taken. Wouldn't that be covered under her homeowners insurance? If I understand correctly, her insurance company should know that she has tenants living on the property and that may increase her premiums because they're now having to consider other people's negligence. But if I were to do something like that and my liability alone did not cover it, they would sue me personally or file a claim against her homeowners policy. I don't understand how my auto policy has anything to do with that?

By the way I should also note that I'm not a malicious person and I would never allow my negligence to be taken out on her. I know the insurance company doesn't give a rats behind that I would accept any and all responsibility for my wrongdoings, but I still don't see (unless it's in a lease that Ive signed) how this is valid.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Valid point. I still don't see how she could be sued for my negligence. If this were the case, people wouldn't rent property (ever). Can you elaborate? Not that I plan on staying here (or running over neighborhood kids), but I'd like to understand how if I hit someone on her property her home could be taken. Wouldn't that be covered under her homeowners insurance? If I understand correctly, her insurance company should know that she has tenants living on the property and that may increase her premiums because they're now having to consider other people's negligence. But if I were to do something like that and my liability alone did not cover it, they would sue me personally or file a claim against her homeowners policy. I don't understand how my auto policy has anything to do with that?

By the way I should also note that I'm not a malicious person and I would never allow my negligence to be taken out on her. I know the insurance company doesn't give a rats behind that I would accept any and all responsibility for my wrongdoings, but I still don't see (unless it's in a lease that Ive signed) how this is valid.
Mass_Shyster is giving you an attorney's viewpoint, which is perfectly valid. If sued, even if the homeowner is eventually found to not be liable, she's still going to be forced to defend herself. Furthermore, depending on the specific set of facts, she may even be found to bear some liability.
 

hulingsd

Member
Mass_Shyster is giving you an attorney's viewpoint, which is perfectly valid. If sued, even if the homeowner is eventually found to not be liable, she's still going to be forced to defend herself. Furthermore, depending on the specific set of facts, she may even be found to bear some liability.
Understandable. And I definitely appreciate it, I finally have an example that makes sense. If that's the case, it needs to be in the lease. Like I said, I've been here for 3 years and it only just came up. She either isn't concerned or doesn't know the implications of having a tenant on her property. She's demanding I do this and giving me a seven day notice to get it done. Different situation and I want to do the right thing, but I think leaving at this point is best. I don't handle conflict very well.
 

PayrollHRGuy

Senior Member
Understandable. And I definitely appreciate it, I finally have an example that makes sense. If that's the case, it needs to be in the lease. Like I said, I've been here for 3 years and it only just came up. She either isn't concerned or doesn't know the implications of having a tenant on her property. She's demanding I do this and giving me a seven day notice to get it done. Different situation and I want to do the right thing, but I think leaving at this point is best. I don't handle conflict very well.
I've never noticed that you told us what the term of your lease is. But you are correct for it to be enforceable it needs to be a requirement of the lease.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Understandable. And I definitely appreciate it, I finally have an example that makes sense. If that's the case, it needs to be in the lease. Like I said, I've been here for 3 years and it only just came up. She either isn't concerned or doesn't know the implications of having a tenant on her property. She's demanding I do this and giving me a seven day notice to get it done. Different situation and I want to do the right thing, but I think leaving at this point is best. I don't handle conflict very well.
I've NEVER seen a residential lease that attempts to control the limits of your automobile liability policy, except to say that it must meet the state minimum.
 
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