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Do you have to pay for employees travel time to their first job site, if they use the company vehicle from their own home?

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Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Yes, but you chose to take a job that was one hour away from where you live. So, that is your normal commute that you voluntarily took on. Other people have even longer commutes than yours. Other than quitting their jobs because some jobs that the employer chooses to take on are an hour away, these employees have no choice in the matter.
The employer is only obligated to pay for travel time that the law says the employer must treat as time worked. And again, for travel within the same city/metropolitan area whether that time must be paid has nothing to do with the amount of time the travel takes. See my prior posts with the links to the DOL rules for travel time. While it would be nice for an employer to compensate for longer than normal commutes to a job, they don't have to do that.
 


cbg

I'm a Northern Girl
Nowhere in the US does an employer have to pay for commuting time. You do not get paid for time from home to the first stop of the day. You do not get paid for the last stop of the day to home. Assuming you are a non-exempt employee, you do get paid for drive time between jobs during the day. There is NO 30 minute rule or anything remotely related to it, in any US state. You don't have to be paid for your commute. Period.

And my normal, every day commute is 2 hours and ten minutes EACH WAY. And yes, I chose the work location and the home location. We can't relocate because of my husband's business and there's very little closer that needs people who do what I do. That doesn't mean is any less exhausting. So don't whine to me, any of you (I'm not singling anyone out here) about thirty minutes. Thirty minutes, pooh - I'd kill for a commute that short.
 

Stephen1

Member
I don't know FL's rules on this, but I've always felt it was fair if any time greater than the normal commute to the office was paid. E.g. it takes employee A 20 minutes to drive to the office. Driving directly to today's job site took 45 minutes so 25 minutes should be on the clock. Employee B needs 60 minutes to get to the office. If it took "B" 45 minutes to get to the job site then their time starts when they arrive.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
Nowhere in the US does an employer have to pay for commuting time. You do not get paid for time from home to the first stop of the day. You do not get paid for the last stop of the day to home. Assuming you are a non-exempt employee, you do get paid for drive time between jobs during the day. There is NO 30 minute rule or anything remotely related to it, in any US state. You don't have to be paid for your commute. Period.

And my normal, every day commute is 2 hours and ten minutes EACH WAY. And yes, I chose the work location and the home location. We can't relocate because of my husband's business and there's very little closer that needs people who do what I do. That doesn't mean is any less exhausting. So don't whine to me, any of you (I'm not singling anyone out here) about thirty minutes. Thirty minutes, pooh - I'd kill for a commute that short.
I have never worked for someone who didn't pay for travel time if it was greater than a normal commute. Of course, in my area an hour's travel time would mean about 60 miles, even during rush hour.
 

cbg

I'm a Northern Girl
Which does not change the fact that nowhere in the US is an employer required to pay an employee for their commuting time, regardless of how long it is.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
I have never worked for someone who didn't pay for travel time if it was greater than a normal commute. Of course, in my area an hour's travel time would mean about 60 miles, even during rush hour.
Then you have been fortunate since the employer is not required to pay for that. It would also appear that in your area paying for a longer commute wouldn't end up costing the employer much.
 

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