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false square footage representation

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underthesun

Guest
What is the name of your state? Michigan.

WHen I bought my home, this is what the advertisement said.


1450 square feet. Sqare footage includes sunroom.


Well, this "sunroom" is nothing more than a "sunporch". No footings. Just a slab, which cannot legally considered living space at all. It is 150 square feet. So actually, I bought a 1300 square foot house.

Is this a misrepresentation on the part of the realtor, or do I not have recourse because of the wording "Square footage includes sunroom".
 


HomeGuru

Senior Member
underthesun said:
What is the name of your state? Michigan.

WHen I bought my home, this is what the advertisement said.


1450 square feet. Sqare footage includes sunroom.


Well, this "sunroom" is nothing more than a "sunporch". No footings. Just a slab, which cannot legally considered living space at all. It is 150 square feet. So actually, I bought a 1300 square foot house.

Is this a misrepresentation on the part of the realtor, or do I not have recourse because of the wording "Square footage includes sunroom".
**A: you would have recourse if at any time there was representation that the sunroom was considered living area. If the area is just a slab with no walls or roof, you saw it before you bought the property and had a chance prior to closing to request a reconfirmation of the square footage of all areas, measure the areas yourself, read the real estate appraisal, building permit and tax office records etc.
In my opinion, you have no case because of the disclaimer "sf includes sunroom". That was your heads up and red flag.
 
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underthesun

Guest
This is definitey an enclosed area, windows, walls, doors, roof,etc.
It looked like living space FOR SURE.
 

HomeGuru

Senior Member
underthesun said:
This is definitey an enclosed area, windows, walls, doors, roof,etc.
It looked like living space FOR SURE.
**A: is that room legal ie. is there a building permit for it, is it listing on the tax office records......
 
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underthesun

Guest
no, no permits, nothing. Ever. i checked. But the former owners did not build it. Is the real estate company liable???
 
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underthesun

Guest
i did get a paper from the city,when i was checking . Im not sure what it is, but it looks like someone went around and checked the place out a few years ago. They made "notes" because there is an acknowledgement about the porch on the paper. Also, the converted garage was also acknowledged on the paper,but no permits. This is a paper directly from the building department. Is this the "tax" thing you talking about, which would make these rooms legal?
 

HomeGuru

Senior Member
underthesun said:
i did get a paper from the city,when i was checking . Im not sure what it is, but it looks like someone went around and checked the place out a few years ago. They made "notes" because there is an acknowledgement about the porch on the paper. Also, the converted garage was also acknowledged on the paper,but no permits. This is a paper directly from the building department. Is this the "tax" thing you talking about, which would make these rooms legal?
**A: you need to do some investigating and talking to the building department people about the "paper', permits etc.
 
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underthesun

Guest
im afraid to do that in fear they may make me tear it all down with no recourse. I t would be taking a chance, maybe I'll leave that can of worms shut.
 

HomeGuru

Senior Member
underthesun said:
im afraid to do that in fear they may make me tear it all down with no recourse. I t would be taking a chance, maybe I'll leave that can of worms shut.
**A: keep in mind that there are risks in your leaving things as-is.
If you ever want to remodel, renovate etc. that requires a building permit or inspection, you may have a serious problem then. Or if you decide to sell years from now, you must disclose the facts and what if the Buyer says I want it all permitted? When you try to get an as-built permit you are denied for several reasons. One of which you must conform to the newest building code at the time you apply for the permit. The old buidling code at the time the structure was built would not apply. There are other factors but I thought I'd name just a few.
 

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