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Filing 2011 IRS Tax Return for Deceased Relative

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What is the name of your state?Nevada

My task is to gather information, fill out and file my relative's 2011 IRS Tax Return

My relative did not keep hardly any records

I called the IRS and obtained my relative's 2011 Transcripts

Listed on Form 1099-B is

1) Last 4 Digits of the Payer's FIN: XXXXX1234

2) 1st four characters on the Payer's Name: ABCD

3) 1st six characters of the Payer's Street Address: 5678 YZ

4) Last 4 digits of my Relative's Account Number: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX5678

and the rest is the information normally seen on a 1099-B

My question is: How do I find out the full names and numbers of 2), 3), and 4)?
 


FlyingRon

Senior Member
Who are you in all this? Unless you are the appointed representative/executor of the estate, you have no authority to do anything.

Second is why? You (or the estate) is not getting a refund for 2011.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
What is the name of your state?Nevada

My task is to gather information, fill out and file my relative's 2011 IRS Tax Return

My relative did not keep hardly any records

I called the IRS and obtained my relative's 2011 Transcripts

Listed on Form 1099-B is

1) Last 4 Digits of the Payer's FIN: XXXXX1234

2) 1st four characters on the Payer's Name: ABCD

3) 1st six characters of the Payer's Street Address: 5678 YZ

4) Last 4 digits of my Relative's Account Number: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX5678

and the rest is the information normally seen on a 1099-B

My question is: How do I find out the full names and numbers of 2), 3), and 4)?
Unfortunately you cannot. I hate that the IRS is now using redacted transcripts as they are almost impossible to work with. You can insist on unredacted transcripts for the last 3 years, but anything older than that only redacted transcripts are available.
 
Unfortunately you cannot. I hate that the IRS is now using redacted transcripts as they are almost impossible to work with. You can insist on unredacted transcripts for the last 3 years, but anything older than that only redacted transcripts are available.
Also listed on 2011 Form 1099-B is

5) last 5 digits of [securities] CUSIP Number XXXXX6789

6) 1st 6 characters of [securities] Desccription: ABCDEF

7) [amount paid] Stocks and Bonds: $12,345

I wonder if the full numbers on the 20188 Form 1099-B are still retained by the IRS?

So if I file bogus numbers for they will catch it?

Or does the IRS throw away the numbers and which messed I can provide guessed values and not get caught?
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
The tax return does not require all of that information. If it was stock sold, then what the return needs is the name of the stock, the basis the taxpayer had in the stock, what the stock sold for, and whether the gain/loss is long or short-term. Account numbers, etc., are not necessary. Do not, under any circumstances, make up numbers or information to put on the return.
 
Unfortunately you cannot. I hate that the IRS is now using redacted transcripts as they are almost impossible to work with. You can insist on unredacted transcripts for the last 3 years, but anything older than that only redacted transcripts are available.
Does the IRS retain each 1099-B Statement as long back as 2013 or does the IRS throw it away?
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Does the IRS retain each 1099-B Statement as long back as 2013 or does the IRS throw it away?
Forms 1099-B filed by any major financial institution are filed electronically. There is no physical Form 1099-B sitting around some IRS storage room. All the data is stored on the computer. Eventually the IRS will purge the computer of data deemed too old to be useful anymore.
 
Unfortunately you cannot. I hate that the IRS is now using redacted transcripts as they are almost impossible to work with. You can insist on unredacted transcripts for the last 3 years, but anything older than that only redacted transcripts are available.
Does the IRS electronically retain the date for each 1099-B Statement from 2013 or does the IRS permanently delete 2013 1099-B data?
 
Unfortunately you cannot. I hate that the IRS is now using redacted transcripts as they are almost impossible to work with. You can insist on unredacted transcripts for the last 3 years, but anything older than that only redacted transcripts are available.
I just found out that if you call and ask the IRS specificlly for UN-REDACTED transcripts they will provide them.

Earlier today I had looked at the 2009 and 2011 transcripts printed in-person at the IRS Office a month ago and noticed the 1099... has all the information unredacted.

I next called the IRS to obtain some detailed un-redacted data from 2010... transcripts and they were able to provide the information.

The IRS also said thet they will snail mail complete un-redacted transcripts for 2009...
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
I just found out that if you call and ask the IRS specificlly for UN-REDACTED transcripts they will provide them.

Earlier today I had looked at the 2009 and 2011 transcripts printed in-person at the IRS Office a month ago and noticed the 1099... has all the information unredacted.

I next called the IRS to obtain some detailed un-redacted data from 2010... transcripts and they were able to provide the information.

The IRS also said thet they will snail mail complete un-redacted transcripts for 2009...
Well, how interesting. I guess I shouldn't be surprised that an IRS agent lied to me.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Well, how interesting. I guess I shouldn't be surprised that an IRS agent lied to me.
I was not surprised unredacted transcripts could be had. The IRS computer keeps the full information; the redaction is done when printing up the request. The redaction is the default for most requests, but as the OP noted you can get the full info upon request, assuming you are the taxpayer involved or the taxpayer's authorized representative.

Your statement makes it appear you believe agents lie routinely and also assumes that the person you talked with lied to you. My experience having both worked for the IRS and having dealt with the IRS representing clients is that most agents and officers do NOT lie. However, it is also the case that few of them know everything about tax law or how the Service does things and some will give out incorrect information as a result. This is particularly true when dealing with taxpayer service reps. They have a little knowledge of a wide range of things, but are typically not experts in any of them. So they can get things wrong. And not many IRS employees know the details of how the IRS computer processing actually works and what is available. They know what they routinely use; what they don't use, they don't know very well.

Assuming that someone lied to you rather than was simply mistaken seems to be the new norm in the U.S. I'm sorry to see that state of affairs. It is one of the reasons why our society is today so divisive. When I was much younger people were far more willing to give someone the benefit of the doubt that they were mistaken rather than immediately assuming the other person lied. I hope some day we return to that more civil society.
 

davew9128

Junior Member
I'm also going to give the rep the benefit of the doubt. I've had a phone rep tell me he was bound by the IRM (true) and I told him that what he was telling me was contrary to the IRC (also true). What was really happening is that the rep's understanding of the IRM was flawed and more often than not, trying to get the rep to both realize and admit this is difficult at best.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
I was not surprised unredacted transcripts could be had. The IRS computer keeps the full information; the redaction is done when printing up the request. The redaction is the default for most requests, but as the OP noted you can get the full info upon request, assuming you are the taxpayer involved or the taxpayer's authorized representative.

Your statement makes it appear you believe agents lie routinely and also assumes that the person you talked with lied to you. My experience having both worked for the IRS and having dealt with the IRS representing clients is that most agents and officers do NOT lie. However, it is also the case that few of them know everything about tax law or how the Service does things and some will give out incorrect information as a result. This is particularly true when dealing with taxpayer service reps. They have a little knowledge of a wide range of things, but are typically not experts in any of them. So they can get things wrong. And not many IRS employees know the details of how the IRS computer processing actually works and what is available. They know what they routinely use; what they don't use, they don't know very well.

Assuming that someone lied to you rather than was simply mistaken seems to be the new norm in the U.S. I'm sorry to see that state of affairs. It is one of the reasons why our society is today so divisive. When I was much younger people were far more willing to give someone the benefit of the doubt that they were mistaken rather than immediately assuming the other person lied. I hope some day we return to that more civil society.
In this instance, I wanted 6 years worth of unredacted transcripts. The agent in question told me that three years was the most that she could give me, and that anything older than that no longer existed in an unredacted version. She was very specific. Does that sound more like an agent who made a mistake or an agent who was just tired of going to effort to create unredacted transcripts?

My biggest beef with the whole redacted bit is that they redact literally everything. So much so that you cannot even tell who the payer is. If they were just redacting the SSNs and EINs I would grouse a bit about it but if at least we can tell who the companies are, we can find ways around that.

There have been many occasions where an IRS agent absolutely insisted that they could not help me with something that I knew they could help me with, and I would politely say goodbye, hang up, call back again and wait again, get another agent and get what I needed. This sort of thing is common knowledge amongst tax professionals. On the other hand, I have had agents go out of their way to find a way to get me what I needed as well.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
In this instance, I wanted 6 years worth of unredacted transcripts. The agent in question told me that three years was the most that she could give me, and that anything older than that no longer existed in an unredacted version. She was very specific. Does that sound more like an agent who made a mistake or an agent who was just tired of going to effort to create unredacted transcripts?
Considering that it doesn't take any more effort to create the unredacted than the redacted ones, I doubt very much this was an attempt to save work. The agent may well have been simply mistaken. I have no way of knowing one way or the other, but can't think of any reason why the employee would lie about this, unless you (or perhaps someone before you) somehow had ticked her off and she was just bent out of shape and decided to be unhelpful.

I've heard employees of all kinds of organizations, not just IRS, state things very specifically that they believed were true about how things work only to turn out to be wrong. There are all kinds of ways people end up believing things that turn out to be wrong. Sure, there are some in any organization who will lie for one reason or another. But I think those tend to be distinctly in the minority in most organizations.
 
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