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Fine for no registration if police didn't ask for proof

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somacska

New member
California
Me and my friends were driving on Route 66 when we got pulled over by the police for speeding. We provided all the documentation the officer has asked for, accepted the claim that we were driving too fast and then continued our trip.
However, we not only received a speeding ticket but a second ticket for vehicle not registered as well. We were driving a rental car and we had/have the registration documents in the car. However, we provided only the documents the officer asked for but did not consider registration.
If they are needed, shouldn't the officer have asked for the registration documents? Is it our fault that we did not automatically showed them? Should we fight the second ticket?
We would appreciate any advice, as we are not US citizens and this topic is not thoroughly discussed online.
 


adjusterjack

Senior Member
It's hard to believe that the officer didn't ask. It's a mantra: "License, registration, insurance."

All you can do is plead not guilty to the registration ticket and take the rental documents to court.
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
The typical mantra when an officer asks for documents is something akin to, "I need to see your license, registration and proof of insurance, please." It would be highly unusual or unexpected for an officer NOT to ask for those.

In any event, the registration ticket should be an issue for the rental company and not the driver or renter. It sounds as if the officer did not see that it was a rental and did not read any documents you provided too carefully.

When do you have to respond to the cite?
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Paperwork is so passe. They never ask for registration or insurance cards here (in fact the latter is not required to be carried). The officer has already determined the registration and insurance status before he even approaches the vehicle.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
I'm going to go out on a limb here... But doesn't everyone when renting a car on a trip keep whatever documentation from the rental company handy?

Granted, my experience is limited to renting from well know companies. Was OP renting from some rent-a-wreck wannabee?!
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
Paperwork is so passe. They never ask for registration or insurance cards here (in fact the latter is not required to be carried). The officer has already determined the registration and insurance status before he even approaches the vehicle.
Wow! They either have uber-capable dispatchers, or operate the MDC while moving or while stationary and before contact (unsafe on both accounts, and often a violation of policy if not state laws).
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
I'm going to go out on a limb here... But doesn't everyone when renting a car on a trip keep whatever documentation from the rental company handy?

Granted, my experience is limited to renting from well know companies. Was OP renting from some rent-a-wreck wannabee?!
They should. It seems unusual that you might hand them the registration separate from the rental agreement, but, I suppose if you easily separate the documents ...
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Not sure why calling up things on the computer while parked before the contact, but its not a violation of policy or the laws here. Lets you know what you may be dealing with.
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
Not sure why calling up things on the computer while parked before the contact, but its not a violation of policy or the laws here. Lets you know what you may be dealing with.
Not safe to be sitting nose into a computer screen while you have a subject pulled over and potentially hiding evidence or plotting to do you harm. Officer safety 101.

If you want to know what you're dealing with, the officer has a radio and a dispatcher, but that doesn't tell you everything.
 

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