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Gas stove connected to propane tank.

#1
Hi,

I bought a house with gas stove connected to a propane tank. The same small propane tank uses for a garden grill. The tank is outside and it is connected to stove in the kitchen by a pipe.

This is a convenient solution for me because I can change tank easily and the cost is smaller than if I would use an electric stove.

I am trying to figure out if this is against codes/insurance rules. Can someone answer me if in case of fire in my house insurance company would not honor and cancel the claim because of this?
 


#2
Hi,

I bought a house with gas stove connected to a propane tank. The same small propane tank uses for a garden grill. The tank is outside and it is connected to stove in the kitchen by a pipe.

This is a convenient solution for me because I can change tank easily and the cost is smaller than if I would use an electric stove.

I am trying to figure out if this is against codes/insurance rules. Can someone answer me if in case of fire in my house insurance company would not honor and cancel the claim because of this?
What is the name of your state?

You will need to check your city codes and your insurance policy.
 
#4
Some of those installations are " pre code" ...be careful about opening up a can of worms . ( My stove is pre code in that it requires an oven match light ) . They are generally safe and not an insurance issue. Connections can readily be checked with a cup of soapy water . As a matter of cost effective use...the cost per gallon in the small 20 lb tanks which are often filled with but 15 lb of propane is often much higher than delivered service to larger tanks. I continue to use the small tanks ..as my usage is so small and I like my old stove....refill is less expensive than exchange .....but there Is language in insurance policy about unapproved changes so I don't mess with the pipes etc just in case.....don't know what is in your policy.

ITs rare that a newer home would be set up for 20lb tanks ...but not uncommon that larger tanks owned by supplier were removed for one reason or another.
 
#5
Tank exchange for the small tanks is a real racket. My local filler charges less than most of the exchange places even if the tank is BONE dry, but far less when you realize the tanks probably still have 1/4 or more of capacity.
 
#6
Tank exchange for the small tanks is a real racket. My local filler charges less than most of the exchange places even if the tank is BONE dry, but far less when you realize the tanks probably still have 1/4 or more of capacity.
My tanks usually end up, well, let's just say "visually unappealing". I prefer being able to just swap for a new one. The cost out here is about $5 more to exchange vs. the minimum charge for filling one tank.
 
#7
I've been known to swap some ugly tanks as well. However, mine usually don't need that level of refreshing. I take it over to my local independent store and have them topped up. That way I always have several FULL tanks ready.