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Getting full control of my SSDI

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DisabledGeek89

Junior Member
What is the name of your state? Virginia

I got SSDI through my Mother's work history. I also get both SSI and SSDI. I have full control of my SSI and direct deposit. Sadly my Mother is my payee for my SSDI. What can I do to change this? What paperwork if any do I need? I heard something about getting a signature from my Physiologist. (My SSDI and SSI are for autism). Anything need to be done?
 


FlyingRon

Senior Member
How old are you? If you are not 18, you have no chance. If you had a payee because you were not yet 18 and now are over that age, you can petition the SSA directly. If you were given a payee because your disability was such that they determined you weren't competent to handle the payments, then yes you will need to get a doctor's letter countermanding that and send it to your SSA handler. If there was a court determination involved in any of this, you'll need to go back there and get that reversed.
 
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FlyingRon

Senior Member
So go to the doctor who knows your condition best and see if he is willing to explain that you are competent to handle your financial dealings. It's a fine line if the autism is the basis of your disability between eligibility and competency.
 

DisabledGeek89

Junior Member
So go to the doctor who knows your condition best and see if he is willing to explain that you are competent to handle your financial dealings. It's a fine line if the autism is the basis of your disability between eligibility and competency.
Do I need specific forum or just a note with his signature and contact info?
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
I assume you meant "form." It needs to be "a doctor's" statement. He needs to be explicit in his reasons, not just that "I see no reason why Geek89 shouldn't be able to manage his own affairs."

But again, the SSA guidance points out that if you're well enough to manage your own affairs with these sort of developmental difficulties being used for the basis for your disability, they may revisit whether you are indeed disabled.
 

DisabledGeek89

Junior Member
I assume you meant "form." It needs to be "a doctor's" statement. He needs to be explicit in his reasons, not just that "I see no reason why Geek89 shouldn't be able to manage his own affairs."

But again, the SSA guidance points out that if you're well enough to manage your own affairs with these sort of developmental difficulties being used for the basis for your disability, they may revisit whether you are indeed disabled.
Like I said earlier, was not an issue when I got full control of my SSI.
 

Janke

Member
The SSA form is an SSA 787, Statement of Capability.

It makes no sense that one program has a rep payee and the other doesn't. You either need a payee or you don't. That needs to be corrected. Hopefully, your treating doctor agrees with you. If the doctor completes the form, you can take it to your local office...well, once they open up again.
 

FarmerJ

Senior Member
If you absolutely must have a payee then call your county and ask them who some of the local payee firms are and get in touch with one of them this way if your mother has control issues regarding your money there should be no problem having someone else do it that is beyond her reach , Ive seen many a guardian- payee try to be very controlling with the clients we serve at work and sometimes having seen what goes on with the client having parent as payee I know a independent - not related third party can be a better choice.
 

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