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Grandparent visitation order question

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LdiJ

Senior Member
#32
Poor kids! Because of the disrespect of father's family by mother, the kids must really hate 1/2 of themselves. They - kids plus mom - should be in therapy.
Did you actually read the thread?

If you did, you would have clearly seen that the grandmother was the problem, and even in the eyes of her own son, before he died.
 

Rushia

Senior Member
#35
I see many problems for the OP. This should have been handled properly when you moved. The courts cannot stop you moving the children in a GPV case. Had you handled it properly, you would not be in this situation now.

At the time you were in court with her, had you not shown your hatred, you might have stood a chance of not having an order imposed on you. You looked unreasonable and the courts knew you would not allow her contact. As their father had passed, the courts knew that would not be an avenue for their continued relationship.

While the other posters are correct that your negativity has affected the children, oh well. It's your decision. This is not the other parent and a completely different type of dynamic. You do NOT have to parent your children with her, she is NOT a coparent.

You will be held in contempt if she pushes it in the courts. You should file to have the visits eliminated with the help of a lawyer. However, I do see your hatred still being an issue and it's possible the judge may order visits in a therapy setting as you've allowed the order to stand as long as you have.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
#36
I see many problems for the OP. This should have been handled properly when you moved. The courts cannot stop you moving the children in a GPV case. Had you handled it properly, you would not be in this situation now.

At the time you were in court with her, had you not shown your hatred, you might have stood a chance of not having an order imposed on you. You looked unreasonable and the courts knew you would not allow her contact. As their father had passed, the courts knew that would not be an avenue for their continued relationship.

While the other posters are correct that your negativity has affected the children, oh well. It's your decision. This is not the other parent and a completely different type of dynamic. You do NOT have to parent your children with her, she is NOT a coparent.

You will be held in contempt if she pushes it in the courts. You should file to have the visits eliminated with the help of a lawyer. However, I do see your hatred still being an issue and it's possible the judge may order visits in a therapy setting as you've allowed the order to stand as long as you have.
In an Arizona case, Dodge vs Graville, which the USSC ruled on in a (I literally cannot remember the what the type of ruling is called, it was a ruling where they did not hear the case at all, they just made a short direct ruling instead of granting certori.), the grandparents tried for therapeutic visitation with a counselor and the higher courts ruled against it. I am paraphrasing like heck here but the gist of things was that there was no public interest reason to having a counselor try to convince the children to love their grandparents.

It was a similar sort of case where the grandparents did have court ordered visitation for a period of time, but their relationship with the children deteriorated to the point where the children had no interest in dealing with their grandparents at all. The USSC ruling on Dodge vs Graville came very shortly after their ruling in Troxail vs Granville.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
#37
In an Arizona case, Dodge vs Graville, which the USSC ruled on in a (I literally cannot remember the what the type of ruling is called, it was a ruling where they did not hear the case at all, they just made a short direct ruling instead of granting certori.), the grandparents tried for therapeutic visitation with a counselor and the higher courts ruled against it. I am paraphrasing like heck here but the gist of things was that there was no public interest reason to having a counselor try to convince the children to love their grandparents.

It was a similar sort of case where the grandparents did have court ordered visitation for a period of time, but their relationship with the children deteriorated to the point where the children had no interest in dealing with their grandparents at all. The USSC ruling on Dodge vs Graville came very shortly after their ruling in Troxail vs Granville.
This case (OP) isn't in Az.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
#38
I see many problems for the OP. This should have been handled properly when you moved. The courts cannot stop you moving the children in a GPV case. Had you handled it properly, you would not be in this situation now.

At the time you were in court with her, had you not shown your hatred, you might have stood a chance of not having an order imposed on you. You looked unreasonable and the courts knew you would not allow her contact. As their father had passed, the courts knew that would not be an avenue for their continued relationship.

While the other posters are correct that your negativity has affected the children, oh well. It's your decision. This is not the other parent and a completely different type of dynamic. You do NOT have to parent your children with her, she is NOT a coparent.

You will be held in contempt if she pushes it in the courts. You should file to have the visits eliminated with the help of a lawyer. However, I do see your hatred still being an issue and it's possible the judge may order visits in a therapy setting as you've allowed the order to stand as long as you have.
Thank You Rushia for taking the time to advise. :cool:
 
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