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How to gain sibling custody

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yankeedee

Member
If you care about the children then you would want CSB involved if she is in Summit County. And if CSB is involved then you would have to complete an ICPC (takes six months approximately) in order to get custody. But this has to be about THEIR safety over your wants. Is it?
Yes it's about them but what about their safety while in the unknown? That's what I'm also worried about. I am the only member of our family even willing to take the boys. They are 14 and 15. The 15 year old is disabled and has a very limited vocabulary. Almost none.
 


Ohiogal

Queen Bee
Yes it's about them but what about their safety while in the unknown? That's what I'm also worried about. I am the only member of our family even willing to take the boys. They are 14 and 15. The 15 year old is disabled and has a very limited vocabulary. Almost none.
Then call the hotline and make an anonymous report. 330-434-KIDS.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
Yes it's about them but what about their safety while in the unknown? That's what I'm also worried about. I am the only member of our family even willing to take the boys. They are 14 and 15. The 15 year old is disabled and has a very limited vocabulary. Almost none.
Frankly, right now, you are an unknown. You are in a different state, you are only 24, you've had limited contact with your brothers during the past 7 years, and it's likely you have neither the experience nor the training to be the full time guardian of a disabled nonverbal teen.

The "unknown" provided by the state might be more qualified and less disruptive.
 

commentator

Senior Member
Something that you're totally not adding into this mix is that you are just a few years out of this situation yourself, and you are vaulting up to the plate to take on something that will be totally life changing and a huge job for you personally. Okay, are you married? What does your spouse think about what you are wanting to do? Do you have a huge income? Do you own your own home, or have a place big enough that the landlord would be open to two more residents? Do you have lots of well thought out plans for arranging the care of your somewhat disabled sibling, possibly for over the long haul? How is all this going to affect your work life? Your home life ? What about the person you're in a relationship with, if you are? Do you have children of your own? Where are they in this situation?

What are you going to do if you get these two nearly grown individuals there with you, whatever your current living and relationship situation is, and they suddenly announce, "You're not the boss of me!" and start doing something really bad, or simply leave? Any family court is going to look at a lot of things other than just the unfitness of their current situation based on a lot of your stories about the past and guesses about what's going on now. One of those things is if where they'd be after this requested change an appropriate placement for them.

And it's likely that any disabled person such as you describe your brother to be comes with a certain amount of state support, which will make his current placement site hang on like bloody murder, regardless of what she may be saying. She's living to some extent, off that money. To be cold, your brother has value as an income source, That will be considered strongly by any court determining his placement.

I understand how you feel. When one older sibling gets out of a very dysfunctional childhood situation, the fantasy they tend to have is that they'll come back and somehow make it better for their younger siblings, save them from all that misery. But you really need to go about this carefully and thoughtfully, and with the advice of a good family attorney. If you can't afford that, you must progress even more slowly. Let me give you a huge hint. If the situation stinks, but isn't bad enough you could deal with the idea of their being removed and put in a foster care placement for a while, it likely isn't bad enough that you're going to get custody.
 
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stealth2

Under the Radar Member
Something else to bear in mind - if the children ARE removed from Mom, the goal is often reunification with the parent through treatment, counseling, other services, etc. That may well preclude removing the children from the state.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Something else to bear in mind - if the children ARE removed from Mom, the goal is often reunification with the parent through treatment, counseling, other services, etc. That may well preclude removing the children from the state.
...especially to someone who is so adamant that the children not be with mom.
 
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