• FreeAdvice has a new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, effective May 25, 2018.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our Terms of Service and use of cookies.

Illegal to gather driftwood or cholla wood from state parks

Accident - Bankruptcy - Criminal Law / DUI - Business - Consumer - Employment - Family - Immigration - Real Estate - Tax - Traffic - Wills   Please click a topic or scroll down for more.

FlyingRon

Senior Member
It is illegal to remove things from the state park without a permit from the director. Texas Administrative Code 59.134
 

xylene

Senior Member
There is no permit, since they DON'T want you doing it. Ask for permission from a private landowner... who will expect to be paid!
 

quincy

Senior Member
Its just dead wood! My goodness.
Dead wood provides nutrients to the soil and shelter for the creatures that inhabit the parks.

Here is a quote from the State Park Rule 59.134 that FlyingRon mentioned:
“It is an offense for any person to take, remove, destroy, deface, tamper with, or disturb any rock, earth, soil, gem, mineral, fossil, or other geological deposit except by permit issued by the director.”

Permits are issued as provided in the Parks and Wildlife Code.

xylene wisely suggested that you contact a private landowner for permission to collect driftwood from their private property.
 

quincy

Senior Member
All states have laws that protect their state’s natural areas and natural resources. The penalties for violating the laws governing state and federal lands can be severe.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Probably what people leaving graffiti on rocks in parks say, too: "It's just a rock! My goodness."

Dumpkoff.
This reminds me of David Benjamin Hall and Glenn Tuck Taylor who destroyed a 20 million year old rock formation in Utah’s Goblin Valley and boasted about their criminal vandalism in a YouTube video.

It is no wonder our planet is suffering. Humans are idiots.
 

stealth2

Under the Radar Member
It does not matter that it's "just dead wood". What matters , legally, is that it is legally protected dead wood.

https://tpwd.texas.gov/state-parks/parks/park-rules/

Note in particular what is stated about "Collecting" and "Firewood". Don't go out of your way to violate federal and state laws.
Those rules are pretty much what I've seen as standard throughout the country - whether, national, state or county parks.
 

Find the Right Lawyer for Your Legal Issue!

Fast, Free and Confidential
Top