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Insurance company wants info

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K

ksk

Guest
Hello,

I have a question: I am receiving letters from the insurance company for my apartment complex asking for amounts which were covered by my health insurance for a slip and fall in my apartment. The slip and fall was due to a large hole in the ceiling which leaked water onto the floor. My health insurance covered a portion of the total bill (x-rays, therapy), but I don't know if I am required to offer up this information to the insurance company. I was under the impression that this information was inadmissible in court, and thus would not be discoverable (I live in Texas). The apartment's insurance company is currently in liquidation, so I am not sure if that changes the rules for discovery. In addition, the letter cited Illinois law (the insurance company's trustee is located in Chicago). I also thought that Texas law should apply, since the injury occurred in Texas. If someone could point me in the proper direction, I would greatly appreciate it.

K
 


I AM ALWAYS LIABLE

Senior Member
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, Verdana">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ksk:
Hello,

I have a question: I am receiving letters from the insurance company for my apartment complex asking for amounts which were covered by my health insurance for a slip and fall in my apartment. The slip and fall was due to a large hole in the ceiling which leaked water onto the floor. My health insurance covered a portion of the total bill (x-rays, therapy), but I don't know if I am required to offer up this information to the insurance company. I was under the impression that this information was inadmissible in court, and thus would not be discoverable (I live in Texas). The apartment's insurance company is currently in liquidation, so I am not sure if that changes the rules for discovery. In addition, the letter cited Illinois law (the insurance company's trustee is located in Chicago). I also thought that Texas law should apply, since the injury occurred in Texas. If someone could point me in the proper direction, I would greatly appreciate it.

K
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My response:

You should get an attorney. They want you to "give the baby away with the bathwater." They would refuse you if you asked them for the same info. This is not something you should be handling alone.

IAAL



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