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internet account access = Fraud?

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wawaewife

Guest
MD

I have just learned through my bank that someone at an IP address other than my own has been accessing my bank account records. No money has been moved or stolen. Does this constitute criminal fraud? How do I go about pressing charges for this? What if more than one person had access to the computer at the traced address?

Thank You
 


JETX

Senior Member
Most ISP's provide variable access ports (and numbers). Are you sure that the 'invading' ISP address is not one of the others provided by your ISP??? Have you traced the offending ISP's numbers to see who/where they are??? Finally, have you contacted your bank about changing your password or other access methods?
 
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wawaewife

Guest
I have already changed my pin and password. However, I suspect this "internet spying" was committed by my ex husband (he knew how to access the account, but DID NOT have my authorization. Would he be guilty of fraud just for going on and viewing my financial info, without trying to use any of it?
 

JETX

Senior Member
Based purely on your post, I don't see that any specific laws were violated, with the exception of possibly the G-L-B Act (see below). Personally, I doubt that any law enforcement would pursue charges, even if you were able to show that he was the 'trespasser'. And since you weren't damaged, then there is no ground for a civil action.

The G-L-B Act (15 U.S.C. § 6821-6827) has to do with obtaining or attempting to obtain private financial information of another. The problem here is that your 'ex' obviously already had the 'financial information' (your bank location and account number used to access).

Reluctantly, I really don't see any 'realistic, practical' chance for a case against the 'trespasser'. Try to document the 'violation' as best you can and then put it away for possible use in the event of future transgressions.
 

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