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IRS Whistleblower Claim - Certified Letter - What's inside?

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What's inside?

  • Junk

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    9

bloodhound2

New member
Hello friends,

After about two or three years, I received a certified letter from the IRS on a whistleblower claim. A corporate mail office picked up the letter on my behalf, but I'm traveling for a few weeks and I don't know what's inside.

Do they send rejection letters by certified mail? Should I make some effort to get the letter?

Best Regards,

Bloodhound2
 


cbg

I'm a Northern Girl
Sorry, but Madame Zuleika is still on vacation and the crystal ball is out being cleaned. The only way I know of that you're going to find out what's in the letter is to get hold of it and open it.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Hahhahaha, yes of course I would if I could do this easily. But is certified mail normal?
It's "normal" in that it is a not-uncommon way to send information that the party wants to prove that it was mailed to you.
 

cbg

I'm a Northern Girl
My friend, the IRS does not send advertising. If they've sent you something certified, it's something that they need you to see. Regardless of what it is, get your freakin' mail.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Remember, if you don't pick it up, that doesn't mean you didn't get it. It's never wise to totally ignore items that come in the mail.
 

bloodhound2

New member
Update: I called the IRS - they say the case is in the 'closed' status but can't say any more. Sounds more and more like a reject!
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Do they send rejection letters by certified mail? Should I make some effort to get the letter?
The IRS does indeed send certified letters for its decisions on whistleblower claims, even for (and especially for) rejections. The reason for that is that the mailing of the notice of decision starts the clock on your 30 day right to appeal the decision to the U.S. Tax Court. See Internal Revenue Code (IRC) § 7623(b)(4). So if you have any interest in appealing an adverse decision, don't delay in picking up that mail and then promptly see a tax attorney who does tax litigation (not all tax attorneys litigate; some only provide tax planning services and perhaps representation of the client before tax agencies). Your lawyer will need some time to draft the petition, so you want to give the lawyer as much of that 30 days as possible.

Edited to add: for more information on how the process works, see the IRS page on
whistleblower claims.
 
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