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lo/Jack

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Koodog

Junior Member
What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Colorado
Is they any legality in requiring car dealers to inform customers that vehicles are equipped with Lo/Jack?

I've just been notified by Lo/Jack that a truck I purchased a year ago has a defective device transmitting a stolen vehicle code. I'm being told I/we stand a good chance of being stopped and detained by police because of this. I'm also concerned to learn that my company vehicle(this truck) has been tracked and monitored without my companies consent. I was never told this equipment was on this truck when I purchased it.
 


Who's on second what's on third.

What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Colorado
Is they any legality in requiring car dealers to inform customers that vehicles are equipped with Lo/Jack?

I've just been notified by Lo/Jack that a truck I purchased a year ago has a defective device transmitting a stolen vehicle code. I'm being told I/we stand a good chance of being stopped and detained by police because of this. I'm also concerned to learn that my company vehicle(this truck) has been tracked and monitored without my companies consent. I was never told this equipment was on this truck when I purchased it.
And, your legal question is...

.._________________________
~ Esperance is what you get when you don't get wanted.
 

quincy

Senior Member
What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Colorado
Is they any legality in requiring car dealers to inform customers that vehicles are equipped with Lo/Jack?

I've just been notified by Lo/Jack that a truck I purchased a year ago has a defective device transmitting a stolen vehicle code. I'm being told I/we stand a good chance of being stopped and detained by police because of this. I'm also concerned to learn that my company vehicle(this truck) has been tracked and monitored without my companies consent. I was never told this equipment was on this truck when I purchased it.
Read the first line, drruthless.
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)? Colorado
Is they any legality in requiring car dealers to inform customers that vehicles are equipped with Lo/Jack?

I've just been notified by Lo/Jack that a truck I purchased a year ago has a defective device transmitting a stolen vehicle code. I'm being told I/we stand a good chance of being stopped and detained by police because of this. I'm also concerned to learn that my company vehicle(this truck) has been tracked and monitored without my companies consent. I was never told this equipment was on this truck when I purchased it.
This doesn't make any real sense to me. If activated by being reported stolen, the Lo-Jack device emits a code that law enforcement can run in order to get the corresponding SVS hit in NCIC. Unless the code is somehow for some other vehicle that HAS been reported stolen, it should come back as a false hit and nothing SHOULD happen.

And unless Lo-Jack has seriously altered their equipment in the past couple of years, it is not a GPS based system so they cannot monitor your movement.

If this vehicle belongs to you (assuming it is your business), and you have not been paying on the service, you can always ask Lo-Jack to remove it.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
If you have the "SureDrive" feature, your lojack also has GPS. This is independent really of those four antenna dealies that the police use for normal Lojack tracking.

Something doesn't quite ring true on this description. Does your car have the "Early Warning" feature? Was there an extra keyfob on your keys?
 

xylene

Senior Member
Is this your car or a company car?

If your car, nothing wrong with getting lo jack removed by a mechanic you ttust.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
How do you know that it's LoJack that contacted you? This one stinks of a scam to me...
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
How do you know that it's LoJack that contacted you? This one stinks of a scam to me...
I was thinking the same thing. Someone saying they could come by to resolve the issue for a fee.

Lo-Jack just doesn't work the way that has been described here. It emits NO signal to the police unless the vehicle has been reported stolen and a signal sent out to activate the Lo-Jack device in the car. Then, it sends a signal out every 30 seconds (as I recall) with an alphanumeric code that a law enforcement receiver can capture and then run via SVS to determine what vehicle that code belongs to. But, the code is attached to a vehicle already entered into SVS, it's not some random "I'm a stolen car" code!
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
There's an additional feature called "early warning" which I asked about that (it's triggered by a key fob and falses a lot due to dying batteries) tells LoJack (not directly the police) that the car has likely been stolen. Still the whole combination of things here makes me suspect there's something else going on.
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
I have seen the early warning system, but that wouldn't trigger the device activation on law enforcement boxes until the stolen vehicle report was made into SVS.

I'm curious whether this communication was legit, or, if there is simply a malfunctioning device with the effects (i.e. the police) being exaggerated.
 

FlyingRon

Senior Member
Correct, it goes to LoJack and then LoJack decides if it should inform the police. THis one is the only aspect of the various system options that even sounds like what was described and even then, it doesn't match exactly.
 

CdwJava

Senior Member
Even if Lo-Jack informs the police, it won't get entered into SVS based upon their contact, so the police would not yet be involved. Until the owner or operator of the vehicle makes contact with the police and reports it as stolen, the code from the device wouldn't match a stolen vehicle. THAT is why this is a head scratcher.
 

Koodog

Junior Member
This doesn't make any real sense to me. If activated by being reported stolen, the Lo-Jack device emits a code that law enforcement can run in order to get the corresponding SVS hit in NCIC. Unless the code is somehow for some other vehicle that HAS been reported stolen, it should come back as a false hit and nothing SHOULD happen.

And unless Lo-Jack has seriously altered their equipment in the past couple of years, it is not a GPS based system so they cannot monitor your movement.

If this vehicle belongs to you (assuming it is your business), and you have not been paying on the service, you can always ask Lo-Jack to remove it.
Per my original post......defective device. It was not reported as stolen. Only sending signal it was.
 

Koodog

Junior Member
On December 26, 2017 (around 7:45 PM) in the Denver area there was a LoJack unit transmitting in error from a vehicle which was received by the Denver police. The Denver police were advised by LoJack regarding this vehicle, "LoJack unit is not wanted and is being deactivated."

Did they advise when the LoJack unit was going off in your vehicle in error (possibly Dec. 25, 26)? If this vehicle was in the Denver area on December 26th possibly traveling down I-25 near downtown Denver around 7:45 PM, I'm thinking this is legit. You can always call LoJack directly and ask them; they can search by the VIN number.

The car dealer will only know LoJack is installed if they are the ones that installed it otherwise they will not be aware.

When LoJack is activated it sends out a code that police have to first query with the crime information center to obtain vehicle details. If the LoJack is going off in error a message will be provided to police that it is not wanted and LoJack will attempt to deactivate the unit. So, no one should be tracking your vehicle if it is going off in error. It will just drive LoJack up the wall (and possibly police) as their towers may pick up the signal and police LoJack receivers may continue to pick up the signal.

Here is what I would do. LoJack is a great invention and worth the money in a large city for an expensive vehicle. They cost about $700 to have installed (one time fee). I would call LoJack and ask if they would be willing to replace the unit free of charge? It would probably take an hour or two. They do not let you watch while they work in order to conceal the location of the unit.

You can private message me Koodog.
Yes I was advised it was going off in error. Evidently they could not deactivate it.
I understand if car dealer did not install it, they would not know. However my query is should it not be known? Clearly some indication inside of vehicle of Lo/Jack being present would resolve any issue as I experienced.
Any driver of this vehicle(company truck) stood the risk of being stopped and detained or whatever LE is capable of because of an unknown device. I find this unacceptable.
Lo/Jack offered nothing but to remove the device.
I agree probably a good investment when it works, however my discussion is when it DOESN'T work.
Which means Lo/Jack knew trucks location when it sent out stolen signal. I call that tracking
Because a procedure is supposed to be followed does not make it so.
 
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