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Tyler98

New member
Hi all
I am working for a transportation company. The interviewer said that there is 1 month of unpaid training and 2 months of probation and receive 85% of salary. In the 4th month, if all requirements are met, I will receive 100% of the salary together with benefits.
What do people think about this case?
 


quincy

Senior Member
Hi all
I am working for a transportation company. The interviewer said that there is 1 month of unpaid training and 2 months of probation and receive 85% of salary. In the 4th month, if all requirements are met, I will receive 100% of the salary together with benefits.
What do people think about this case?
What is the name of your state?
 

adjusterjack

Senior Member
I think "unpaid training" might be illegal.

Contact your state's department of labor and ask about it.

Even if it isn't illegal, personally, I'd walk away rather then spend a month working for no pay.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I think "unpaid training" might be illegal.

Contact your state's department of labor and ask about it.

Even if it isn't illegal, personally, I'd walk away rather then spend a month working for no pay.
The state name would be nice.

If training is paid for by the transportation company, this can make a difference in the legality.

I agree that contacting the state’s department of labor and having the contract reviewed by a legal professional are good steps to take.
 

PayrollHRGuy

Senior Member
If you are being sent to a school to say, get a CDL, and they are paying for the school that would likely be legal as far as federal labor law goes.

If the 85% is still above minimum wage that would also be legal.
 

paddywakk

Member
I had a relative who fell for a scheme like this, and discovered that after the period of unpaid "training" he didn't meet their requirements and was let go. Nice way to get free labor!
 

quincy

Senior Member
There is way too much that is not known about Tyler98’s employment with the transportation company to say if what he has encountered is legal or not.

It sounds as if Tyler is already working for the company. Perhaps he is only now rethinking the whole “we aren’t paying you” part of his job.
 

PayrollHRGuy

Senior Member
I had a relative who fell for a scheme like this, and discovered that after the period of unpaid "training" he didn't meet their requirements and was let go. Nice way to get free labor!
Almost any training that financially benefits the employer directly must be paid.
 

paddywakk

Member
Agreed, but here is a poster whose first weeks will be unpaid for training. I'm just saying, don't fall for this
 

PayrollHRGuy

Senior Member
Agreed, but here is a poster whose first weeks will be unpaid for training. I'm just saying, don't fall for this
If as I assumed in my original response it is something like initial CDL training it is not only legal but also normal and a pretty good deal for the employee.
 

quincy

Senior Member
If as I assumed in my original response it is something like initial CDL training it is not only legal but also normal and a pretty good deal for the employee.
I know that similar arrangements are made in education. You have a period of unpaid “training” when student teaching.
 

Tyler98

New member
There is way too much that is not known about Tyler98’s employment with the transportation company to say if what he has encountered is legal or not.

It sounds as if Tyler is already working for the company. Perhaps he is only now rethinking the whole “we aren’t paying you” part of his job.
Im in the first week of training :(
 

quincy

Senior Member
Im in the first week of training :(
You can have your paperwork personally reviewed by an attorney in your area to determine the legality of the terms of your employment. In the meantime, try to make the most of the training and, if you find it not worth the effort, start looking for another job.

Good luck.
 

BuyLowSellHigh

Active Member
I see that you were now asking about whether you can quit. Of course you can quit whenever you want to. Read your contract because you likely agreed to reimburse them for training expenses if you quit.

The idea is that they provide training in exchange for you then working long enough for them so they can recoup training expenses. They require you sign a contract before you start. That was your opportunity to review the requirements of the contract. If you don't like the terms of the contract now it's likely too late.
 

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