• FreeAdvice has a new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, effective May 25, 2018.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our Terms of Service and use of cookies.

Problems with law

Accident - Bankruptcy - Criminal Law / DUI - Business - Consumer - Employment - Family - Immigration - Real Estate - Tax - Traffic - Wills   Please click a topic or scroll down for more.

#16
You really ought to do some research about vaping. You may change your opinion.

I'm hoping that you're not serious on this. YOU are the child's parent. Why would you yield your parental decision-making to random strangers on the internet?
Parents can make mistakes also. So if 2 people say that it's bad I'll take it into consideration.
 


Just Blue

Senior Member
#17
Parents can make mistakes also. So if 2 people say that it's bad I'll take it into consideration.
One should not parent by "popular decision". You might pick out a movie to go to on that standard...but not parenting. One parents by intellect, love and commonsense. Knowing your child and helping him to become a happy, healthy productive adult.
 

HRZ

Senior Member
#19
You are the parent ...and it's up to you to set the rules. ( absent some law on point ) so if you think vaporizers are not appropriate, it's your right to say NO.....it's not up to us here to second guess you .

BTW it's probably illegal under 18 as well! Q
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
#20
You are the parent ...and it's up to you to set the rules. ( absent some law on point ) so if you think vaporizers are not appropriate, it's your right to say NO.....it's not up to us here to second guess you .

BTW it's probably illegal under 18 as well! Q
Did you even read this thread?
 

Shadowbunny

Queen of the Not-Rights
#21
Parents can make mistakes also. So if 2 people say that it's bad I'll take it into consideration.
Here is a list of other things you shouldn't let your child do, because they are 1) illegal and/or 2) dangerous:

1) Heroin, cocaine, hashish, and any drugs not prescribed by a doctor.
2) Rob a bank
2) Rob a liquor store
3) Rob anyone else
4) Steal cars
5) Excessive/reckless driving
6) Other things determined to be illegal in the city/county/state/country in which you live

You do NOT need another person telling you that you shouldn't allow your child to do something that is illegal or dangerous.
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
#22
Here is a list of other things you shouldn't let your child do, because they are 1) illegal and/or 2) dangerous:

1) Heroin, cocaine, hashish, and any drugs not prescribed by a doctor.
2) Rob a bank
2) Rob a liquor store
3) Rob anyone else
4) Steal cars
5) Excessive/reckless driving
6) Other things determined to be illegal in the city/county/state/country in which you live

You do NOT need another person telling you that you shouldn't allow your child to do something that is illegal or dangerous.
I totally agree Shadow!! Hopefully now with two votes on how the ^ actions are bad OP might take it under consideration. ;)
 

quincy

Senior Member
#23
Missouri.
Hi there.
That's not the best thing to tell about. I adopted my son when he was a little boy. Now he's going to school, he's 17. He bought a vaporizer. SOmeone at school saw that and teachers started calling me and tell that I'm a bad mother. That I don't know that my son is smoking.
They want to bring this subject into court. I'm really nervous now.
I thought vaping is allowed.
Help someone, please.
I was looking through different sites. Vapingdaily says it's allowed to vape only when you 18+. Don't know what to do in that situation. I really love my son, but didn't think it could cause such problems.
If this is your son's first offense, it is an infraction and the vaping products will be confiscated. With a second offense, your son can be ordered by a court to complete a tobacco or smoking education and cessation program.

Vaping by a minor (under age 18) is not permitted under Missouri laws but it cannot exactly be labeled a major crime. Your son's biggest issue may be that he was in school at the time his vaping was discovered.

Quite frankly, if vaping is the worst thing your 17-year-old son has done or will do, you are a fortunate parent.

Good luck.
 

stealth2

Under the Radar Member
#24
I gotta agree with quincy. It's easy to wag fingers and tell others what terrible choices they make. But sometimes? It's a wise parent who chooses the lesser of two evils. And that choice can also be a way of educating. I know parents who think I was a bad Mom for sharing a (alcoholic) drink out on the stoop with my minor (legal in my state, btw). But it also lessened the mystique of drinking, and both of my girls are responsible drinkers as adults.
 

xylene

Senior Member
#26
At 17 I was smoking close to 2 packs a day and had been smoking for 2 years.

I credit vaping with a big part of quitting. I no longer smoke or vape for a lot of reasons but the availability of an easy to use and pleasant to use nicotine delivery system that was very easy to step down was huge. Pretty much the battery died, I forgot to charge it and then never looked back.

Comparing vaping to meth or heroin use is BEYOND absurd.

Vaping is a massive harm reduction from smoking and it is very easy to stop vaping because the user can easily blend the nicotine level to the point it is no longer rewarding and then extinction occurs and the brain is free from the cycle of reward from nicotine and the device is abandoned.
 
#27
If this is your son's first offense, it is an infraction and the vaping products will be confiscated. With a second offense, your son can be ordered by a court to complete a tobacco or smoking education and cessation program.

Vaping by a minor (under age 18) is not permitted under Missouri laws but it cannot exactly be labeled a major crime. Your son's biggest issue may be that he was in school at the time his vaping was discovered.

Quite frankly, if vaping is the worst thing your 17-year-old son has done or will do, you are a fortunate parent.

Good luck.
Thank you Quincy.
 
Sponsored Ad

Top