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Student loans/bankruptcy--where do I file?

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bustedacres

Junior Member
What is the name of your state? Washington

I've gotten myself into trouble; I have a small credit card debt--about $2000--but I also have an enormous student loan debt (around $50,000). I hope to get the debt diminished or eliminated by bankruptcy--the $400 per month payments are simply impossible for me to make.

So my question is: do I attempt to file for bankruptcy in Washington, where I now live, or in Pennsylvania, where I obtained the loans (and went to school)?

Also, any advice as to what constitutes "undue hardship" in repayment of those loans would be very helpful. I am able-bodied but don't make enough to even approach such payments.

Thanks for your help.
 


You Are Guilty

Senior Member
bustedacres said:
What is the name of your state? Washington

I've gotten myself into trouble; I have a small credit card debt--about $2000--but I also have an enormous student loan debt (around $50,000). I hope to get the debt diminished or eliminated by bankruptcy--the $400 per month payments are simply impossible for me to make.

So my question is: do I attempt to file for bankruptcy in Washington, where I now live, or in Pennsylvania, where I obtained the loans (and went to school)?

Also, any advice as to what constitutes "undue hardship" in repayment of those loans would be very helpful. I am able-bodied but don't make enough to even approach such payments.

Thanks for your help.
Based on these facts, you have exacly a 0% change of having your student loans discharged through bankruptcy. Guess you shouldn't have majored in "communications" after all, huh?
 

Who's Liable?

Senior Member
bustedacres said:
What is the name of your state? Washington

I've gotten myself into trouble; I have a small credit card debt--about $2000--but I also have an enormous student loan debt (around $50,000). I hope to get the debt diminished or eliminated by bankruptcy--the $400 per month payments are simply impossible for me to make.

So my question is: do I attempt to file for bankruptcy in Washington, where I now live, or in Pennsylvania, where I obtained the loans (and went to school)?

Also, any advice as to what constitutes "undue hardship" in repayment of those loans would be very helpful. I am able-bodied but don't make enough to even approach such payments.

Thanks for your help.

as the previous poster stated, there is no way that you will be able to discharge these debts...

There are people missing limbs who can't get these discharged... Undue hardship is primarily given to those who can prove that they will NEVER EVER be able to pay back the loans...

You are an able bodied adult who CAN work... Your responsibility is to rightfully payback what you borrowed...

If you cannot afford to make the payments, you have two options: Don't payback and basically ruin your credit for the rest of your life... Defaulting on a govt. student loan is probably the worst thing that anybody can do; OR get a second job to cover what you are lacking...

After all, you DID agree to pay all the money back... They even told you how much it was going to be, and for how long...
 
bustedacres said:
What is the name of your state? Washington

I've gotten myself into trouble; I have a small credit card debt--about $2000--but I also have an enormous student loan debt (around $50,000). I hope to get the debt diminished or eliminated by bankruptcy--the $400 per month payments are simply impossible for me to make.

So my question is: do I attempt to file for bankruptcy in Washington, where I now live, or in Pennsylvania, where I obtained the loans (and went to school)?

Also, any advice as to what constitutes "undue hardship" in repayment of those loans would be very helpful. I am able-bodied but don't make enough to even approach such payments.

Thanks for your help.

If they are federally backed loans, you might be able to qualify for deferment or forbearance. This will help you buy some time while you get a better job or straighten out your financial situation.
 

itsmeDAD

Junior Member
50,000 in student loans?

First of, you need to consolidate your student loans. 400.00 is a bit high. however there is a loop hole. if you can obtain a loan, then pay off your student loan with it I would, then file away. how ever. you can file hardships and foreberances for a nuber of reasons. good luck,


Dad
 

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