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to sue or not to sue?

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skh11

Junior Member
What is the name of your state? PA

My son (10 yrs old) has been seeing an allergist for 5 years. He was skin tested and had a mild reaction to one of the injections. He was put on oral medication, nasal spray, and advised to buy special things to help. He was eventually put on shots too because nothing seemed to be working. After an ordeal of severe hives due to a sinus infection (I called dr. several times and had him to see the PA) I had had enough. I called another Dr. and set up an appointment. He was skin tested again. Again had a "mild" (Dr. said it was so minor, that he could not record it as a positive reaction) reaction to the same substance. Then was told that my son does NOT suffer from allergies. This child has endured sinus infections, pnuemonia and countless days of being miserable because of this Dr.'s negligence. Do I have a case?
 


ellencee

Senior Member
My son (10 yrs old) has been seeing an allergist for 5 years. He was skin tested and had a mild reaction to one of the injections. He was put on oral medication, nasal spray, and advised to buy special things to help. He was eventually put on shots too because nothing seemed to be working. After an ordeal of severe hives due to a sinus infection (I called dr. several times and had him to see the PA) I had had enough. I called another Dr. and set up an appointment. He was skin tested again. Again had a "mild" (Dr. said it was so minor, that he could not record it as a positive reaction) reaction to the same substance. Then was told that my son does NOT suffer from allergies. This child has endured sinus infections, pnuemonia and countless days of being miserable because of this Dr.'s negligence. Do I have a case?
I sincerely doubt any variance from acceptable standard of care. Perhaps the information below will be of use to you:
Sinusitis or Sinus Infection

Sinusitis refers to a viral or bacterial infection of the sinuses. Around the eyes, under the cheekbones, and high into the nasal passages, there are cavities in the bone or "air pockets" known as sinuses. These spaces can become infected by a virus, or bacteria leading to inflammation of the sinuses, producing the classic symptoms associated with sinusitis. Patients with a long history for allergic rhinitis have an increased incidence of secondary bacterial or viral infection of the sinuses.

Common symptoms of sinusitis include runny nose and posterior nasal drip which can result in a yellowish or greenish nasal discharge. Dull facial pain or headache in the area of the sinuses is common. Tenderness may also be noted over the lower forehead or cheekbones. Congestion, fever, ear pain, and sore throat often accompany sinusitis. A cough can develop secondarily to the constant posterior nasal drip that inflames the trachea (wind-pipe).

Evaluation is by history and physical examination. Blood tests for blood count may be done in special cases. X-rays of the sinuses can show characteristic changes associated with this infection. Culture of the sinus drainage can yield information on the type of infection and its susceptibility to antibiotics. Patients who have an uncertain diagnosis may have a CT scan performed of the sinuses.

Treatment is with decongestants (e.g.pseudo-ephedrine hydrochloride , phenylpropanolamine) to "dry up" excess secretions. Antihistamines (Hismanal, Seldane) are also helpful in selected cases. Antibiotics are indicated in those cases with fever, coloured nasal discharge, or x-ray findings which are consistent with sinusitis. Antibiotic therapy is often necessary for 3-4 weeks duration to reduce the likelihood of recurrence. Patients will be encouraged to drink plenty of fluids. In most cases, bed rest, fever control, and follow-up with an ENT physician is advisable.

Allergic Rhinitis & Nasal Polyps

Allergic rhinitis results from the inflammation and irritation of the nasal mucosa (lining of the nose) in response to a wide variety of allergic stimuli pollen, house dust, animal dander, fungus, moulds, foods, grasses, etc. Allergic rhinitis may only be seasonal (when that particular stimulus is prevalent) or "year around" for the patient with multiple environmental allergies.

Chronic allergic rhinitis can lead to the growth of nasal polyps in the nose and paranasal sinuses. These outgrowths of tissue are usually benign mucosal lesions, which can result in difficult nose breathing, chronic runny nose, and recurrent sinus infections.

Common symptoms of allergic rhinitis include a clear, watery nasal discharge, itchy nose, and sneezing with watery and itchy eyes. There is usually no sore throat or fever present. The patient is bothered by the allergic symptoms, but does not have the "run down" feeling that accompanies a cold.

Evaluation may involve allergy testing with conventional skin testing, or blood (RAST) testing often performed by a specialised physician known as an Allergist. Sinus x-rays may be performed to rule out sinus infection.

Treatment :
1. Oral antihistamines (Benadryl is available nonprescription). There are newer, longer lasting antihistamines available by prescription (Hismanal, Seldane) that do not have the sedative side effects of other antihistamines.
2. Allergy control eye drops (some nonprescription forms are available). Stronger drops are available only by prescription (Opticrom 4% Eye Drops)
3. Decongestants (numerous nonprescription medications available). - pseudo-ephedrine hydrochloride and phenylpropanolamine may be of help.
4. Steroid nasal sprays (Nasalide, by prescription only) and inhalers (Beconase Nasal Inhaler).
5. With desensitisation therapy (repeated weekly injections of a mixture of allergens), your allergic symptoms may decrease. Approximately 80% of all patients will improve with this treatment.
6. An air conditioned atmosphere in which unwanted allergens are filtered out.
7. Limiting your exposure to the offending agent.
8. Antibiotics in cases where secondary bacterial infection (sinusitis) may exist.
9. Patients with nasal passage obstruction (difficult nose breathing) may have nasal polyps, that can be surgically removed by the qualified ENT physician.

The Allergist/Immunologist can help you with this problem.
EC
 

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