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Undercover Police Investigation

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What is the name of your state? Colorado. I called 911 when I found my husband unresponsive, on the floor at home, police, and paramedics responded to my home and after working on him a bit they went ahead and pronounced him dead. Afterward, the police asked me for consent to search my home, I told them no, they made me wait outside while they searched anyway all while my dead husband is still lying on the floor. They later lied and said they had gotten a search warrant and then while I was still outside being guarded by one of the police officers they brought my husband out in a body bag with what sounded like half of my household items in the bag with him. Would it be worthwhile to try and sue the police for violating my 4th Amendment rights and for the damages they caused during their undercover investigation of me that started 3 months after the death of my husband?
 

Just Blue

Senior Member
What is the name of your state? Colorado. I called 911 when I found my husband unresponsive, on the floor at home, police, and paramedics responded to my home and after working on him a bit they went ahead and pronounced him dead. Afterward, the police asked me for consent to search my home, I told them no, they made me wait outside while they searched anyway all while my dead husband is still lying on the floor. They later lied and said they had gotten a search warrant and then while I was still outside being guarded by one of the police officers they brought my husband out in a body bag with what sounded like half of my household items in the bag with him. Would it be worthwhile to try and sue the police for violating my 4th Amendment rights and for the damages they caused during their undercover investigation of me that started 3 months after the death of my husband?
I'm very sorry for your loss...

What was the cause of death? What did they remove from your home? Is this drug related? Did your husband have a history of drug addiction? Have you been charged? If so..for what?
 

quincy

Senior Member
Have you been charged with a crime?

Did the police ever show you a search warrant? Were you given a list of items taken from your home?

Were any illegal items, like drugs, visible upon entry into your home?

Whether any rights were violated depends on answers to all of the questions asked - but certainly if you are under investigation for a crime or charged with a crime, you should be speaking only with an attorney you hire and not with any law enforcement officers.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
This sounds very familiar; this question has been posted before.

The mention of "...a body bag with what sounded like half of my household items in the bag with him" sounds very familiar.
Yes. That is a memorable line.

OP had another thread that was mistakenly deleted just a few min's before this one was posted.
Oh, the one I am thinking of was quite some time ago.

The poster did not specify whether anything specifically had been taken.

Evidence from a search would not be transported in a body bag.

If the poster believes that specific items were stolen by the responding officers, a complaint can be filed.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Not sure...I was posting to it when it went "poof!" so I asked OP why did she deleted. She said she didn't mean to. I "think" she did the edit thing, but I am not sure.
Ah. I missed the first posting of the thread.

Well ... if StinkingBadges has not viewed the following video, she should view it now, before she speaks to the police. And then she would be smart to see an attorney.

 

CdwJava

Senior Member
Quite frankly, if the police respond to a home and find a victim of a suspicious death, they are going to look for a cause. It may be as simple as searching for what items (food, drink, meds) had been consumed, or as extensive as a search for weapons, points of entry and exit, etc. And, if consent is denied, a search warrant would be forthcoming. I have to say that the ONLY denials for consent I recall receiving when a deceased person is involved have been when the person able to grant consent is a suspect.

As mentioned, the police are NOT going to remove evidence in a body bag. The body, alone, should be in there. If the body had tubes or wires from any medical devices attached to it, they would also be in there. But, no evidence. That'd be stupid.
 

quincy

Senior Member
Quite frankly, if the police respond to a home and find a victim of a suspicious death, they are going to look for a cause. It may be as simple as searching for what items (food, drink, meds) had been consumed, or as extensive as a search for weapons, points of entry and exit, etc. And, if consent is denied, a search warrant would be forthcoming. I have to say that the ONLY denials for consent I recall receiving when a deceased person is involved have been when the person able to grant consent is a suspect.

As mentioned, the police are NOT going to remove evidence in a body bag. The body, alone, should be in there. If the body had tubes or wires from any medical devices attached to it, they would also be in there. But, no evidence. That'd be stupid.
Hmm. CdwJava, your response to the questions asked by StinkingBadges is starting to make this thread seem familiar to me now. Perhaps StinkingBadges has posted here before under a different user name .... :unsure:
 

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