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What’s no fault insurance?

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Elinalynn

New member
What is the name of your state? New York. Recently had auto accident. Insurance sent me an application of no fault insurance, should I fill and sign? I don’t know what is? And I do have bills came from hospital and ambulance also.
 


LdiJ

Senior Member
What is the name of your state? New York. Recently had auto accident. Insurance sent me an application of no fault insurance, should I fill and sign? I don’t know what is? And I do have bills came from hospital and ambulance also.
There is no where near enough information here to answer you. The details of the accident are needed and whose insurance company sent you that application.

However, no fault insurance is generally the type of insurance where nobody is treated as at fault in an accident and each insurance company covers their own insured.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
What is the name of your state? New York. Recently had auto accident. Insurance sent me an application of no fault insurance, should I fill and sign? I don’t know what is? And I do have bills came from hospital and ambulance also.
Well, you're making an insurance claim, are you not? New York is a "no fault" state.

In order to make an insurance claim, you have to fill out the paperwork.
 

adjusterjack

Senior Member
Insurance sent me an application of no fault insurance, should I fill and sign?
I assume that this is your own insurance company and this is the claim for No-Fault benefits under your own policy.

If yes to that, fill it out, sign it, and attach copies of your medical and ambulance bills.

No Fault Benefits
These are benefits paid by the insurance company of the car you were driving, was a passenger in or were struck by as a pedestrian, regardless of fault as to the cause of the accident. These benefits include payment of medical bills, prescription drugs, lost wages, housekeeping and/or transportation to and from medical providers, all as the result of the accident. There is a very short time, only 30 days from the date of the accident, in order to file an application for these benefits.
Call your claim rep and find out if payments are made to you or to your medical providers. If to your medical providers follow up to make sure they get paid.
 

justalayman

Senior Member
Well, you're making an insurance claim, are you not? New York is a "no fault" state.

In order to make an insurance claim, you have to fill out the paperwork.
Just to make this clear

The no fault system involved in New York is regarding personal injury (medical bills). Property damages are still under an at fault system. Michigan is the only state that has no fault property damage and even that isn’t a pure no fault situation.
 

ALawyer

Senior Member
New York is among the minority of states that allows people injured in an automobile accident to recover the costs of their medical and related bills for injuries sustained while a passenger in a car that is involved in an auto accident in New York, regardless of whether the driver of the car was at fault. That saves occupants of the car the difficulty of proving whether the driver of the car you were in, or the other driver, was at fault. It was intended to simplify what otherwise could be a long and complicated process of getting medical expenses paid, and also limits the need for everyone injured to hire a lawyer and/or rely on the good faith of the insurance companies for the drivers involved.

The New York no fault provisions provide for almost automatic payment for medical expenses -- up to the policy limits -- but NOT for pain and suffering. In fact New York's no fault law limits any recovery for more than medical expenses or lost wages for a personal injury sustained in an auto accident -- unless the injury is deemed "serious" and results in such things as a broken bone, serious disfigurement, loss of use of a body organ or member or function, or total disability for 90 days.

If you suffered property damage -- such as if the car you were in was damaged -- that is NOT covered by NY's no fault law.
 
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