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Work in NYC with CA being princ residence

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pv488

New member
#1
My son who lives in CA with spouse is considering a job offer in NYC, He will live in NYC or New Jersey while working in NYC and spouse will remain in CA.
Would he have to file a tax return as a resident of NYC (or NJ) and then taxes paid to states will be used as a credit on their CA tax return?
Is there a better approach?
 


not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
#2
Your married adult son should create his own userid and ask this, or look it up himself.

I believe that he will have to part-year resident tax forms for both states.

But in any case, if he actually asked you to come here on his behalf, then he should consult a tax professional.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
#3
Would he have to file a tax return as a resident of NYC (or NJ) and then taxes paid to states will be used as a credit on their CA tax return?
Is there a better approach?
He will have to file income tax returns in both states. He will be a resident of one of them; which one will depend on all the facts, which of course I do not have. Whichever state he is resident he will file as a resident of that state and claim a credit for the tax paid to the other.
 

LdiJ

Senior Member
#6
He will have to file income tax returns in both states. He will be a resident of one of them; which one will depend on all the facts, which of course I do not have. Whichever state he is resident he will file as a resident of that state and claim a credit for the tax paid to the other.
NYC will consider him a resident whether he agrees that he is or not. They are VERY aggressive about that.
 

xylene

Senior Member
#7
NYC will consider him a resident whether he agrees that he is or not. They are VERY aggressive about that.
More or less, If he maintains a dwelling unit there, legally he is a resident, whatever dwelling he has elsewhere or in another state. that's why he needs a tax pro in advance to make sure the money is right.
 
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