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Wrongful death suit?

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quincy

Senior Member
I have no idea what a wrongful death case is worth, I am merely asking you guys what you think as I am exploring my options.
I tried to talk with some lawyers and they want $300 to talk...

I would like to hire a private investigator to look into this guy but, I am not rich, and I am not getting an inheritance so perhaps that is not a good idea for me to do financially. It will most likely end fruitless anyways, since it appears to be random.
The media in your area is investigating and reporting on the guy. I see no need for you to hire a private detective.

Any assets the fellow has probably will be eaten up in criminal defense attorney costs but what is left over probably will need to be split by the numerous victims. I don't know what you can expect to recover in a lawsuit.

You can speak to an attorney in Seattle. Most personal injury lawyers offer free initial consultations and then work on a contingency basis.
 


quincy

Senior Member
Since you are the son who was left out of the will, I cannot see anywhere that you would have much standing.
If I am not mistaken, simply being left out of a will does not preclude kstarfire from being named as a party to a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the personal representative of the family against the drunk driver/shooter.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
If I am not mistaken, simply being left out of a will does not preclude kstarfire from being named as a party to a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the personal representative of the family against the drunk driver/shooter.
Correct - with regard to a wrongful death suit, the status of the person in the will has no bearing.
 

commentator

Senior Member
Agree that is legally true. But would this person need to be able to say he suffered any special personal loss due to his father's passing except grief? (and disappointment with his inheritance of course!) It almost sounds like he thinks the next wife hired someone to do away with his father, once she got the will in her favor, the things about hiring a private detective. Most of the wrongful death lawsuits I've ever heard of, as on Crime TV, the lawsuits were after there was suspicion or evidence that someone did it who has not been convicted by the courts, such as the Ronald Goldman case.
 
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Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Agree that may be legally true. But seriously, how could this guy say he suffered any special personal loss due to his father's passing except grief? (and disappointment with his inheritance of course!)
I think that a jury may award a large amount for punitive damages in this case.
 

Litigator22

Active Member
Designated beneficiaries and/or the estate of the deceased have standing . . . .
To any "relative" of the victim you are now adding "designated beneficiaries" as have standing to commence an action for wrongful death?

A somewhat broad classification wouldn't you say? Might require reserving Seattle's T-Mobile Park for the trial.

Did you by chance come across Michigan's MCL 600. 2922 on your way to the "links"? Somewhat reminiscent of RCW 4.20.010
 

quincy

Senior Member
To any "relative" of the victim you are now adding "designated beneficiaries" as have standing to commence an action for wrongful death?

A somewhat broad classification wouldn't you say? Might require reserving Seattle's T-Mobile Park for the trial.

Did you by chance come across Michigan's MCL 600. 2922 on your way to the "links"? Somewhat reminiscent of RCW 4.20.010
I sort of explained this already, didn't I?

Thanks for the chuckle, though. :)
 

kotlaw

New member
I think it would ideal to consult a lawyer to get guidance in detail because, for this kind of cases, communication is important. A lot of things may have in mind of a lawyer that he would like to clear, to give the best possible solution to your situation.
 

quincy

Senior Member
I think it would ideal to consult a lawyer to get guidance in detail because, for this kind of cases, communication is important. A lot of things may have in mind of a lawyer that he would like to clear, to give the best possible solution to your situation.
This thread is over a month old.

I agree that communication is important.
 
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