+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    4

    Is my employer violating labor laws?

    What is the name of your state (only U.S. law)?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    4

    Details

    Your Question was:
    Is my employer following labor laws?
    I work at a private school as an elementary teacher. I'm not sure if my employee is following the law when it comes to payment. I work 8.25 hours per day and sometimes on Sundays. I get paid $36,000 per school year 10 months. Am I exempt? Should I be receiving overtime? Also, we are only paid once a month. We started work on 08/28 and will not get paid until 10/05. Often our pay is a day or to late. I'm wondering if this is legal. We get no benefits such as health insurance as well.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    1,937
    You did not list your state and it might matter .

    In general teachers are professional employees and exempt at Federal level ( no OT and they can work you 24/7 )
    State law matters so to when you get paid...but being a day or two late to get paid is not a Hill I'd want to die upon.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Peconic River
    Posts
    2,383
    Also, there is nothing wrong with being paid once per month.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    4

    California

    My state is California. It was my understanding the payment was to be paid twice monthly. Regardless of that, we are now waiting a month and two weeks to get paid. I doubt that's leagal. Also, because minimum wage was raised here, I do not believe we are being paid the required salary to be considered exempt. Therefore, aren't we entitled to overtime? I just want to confirm I am understanding it correctly. Thank you!

    Here's what the labor law website states:

    Effective January 1, 2016, California’s minimum wage increased to $10.00 per hour. This rate is applicable to and affects independent schools. At first glance, the takeaway from the new law seems apparent – a rise in minimum wage increases the hourly compensation for hours worked by minimum-wage employees. The change is particularly important when considered in combination with recent legal precedents that have expanded the meaning of “hours worked.” For example, as we previously wrote about here, the California Supreme Court has found that in certain instances sleep time may be considered “hours worked,” for certain employees.

    The minimum wage increase, however, has another important implication for independent schools. California’s overtime laws require employers to compensate “non-exempt” employees who work in excess of eight hours in one workday or in excess of 40 hours in one workweek, at a rate of either one and one-half or two times the regular rate of pay, depending on the amount of excess time worked. Exempt status is determined, in substantial part, by whether an employee earns a monthly salary of at least two times the state minimum wage of $10.00 per hour. The minimum wage increase, therefore, now sets a higher compensation threshold that employees must meet to reach exempt status.

    Criteria for exempt status for private sector employees are set forth by California’s Labor Code and by the Industrial Welfare Commission. Particularly, California Labor Code section 515.8 sets forth requirements that independent school teachers must meet to satisfy the “exempt” status. The labor code provision exempts a teacher at a private elementary or secondary academic institution (K-12) from overtime if the following conditions are met:

    The employee is primarily engaged in the duty of teaching, instructing, or lecturing;
    The employee regularly exercises discretion and independent judgment in performing the duties of a teacher;
    The employee attains at least a baccalaureate or higher degree from an accredited institution of higher education, or compliance with the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, or the equivalent certification authority in another state; and
    The employee earns a monthly salary equivalent to no less than two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment.
    In other words, an employee is not automatically exempt by virtue of working in a “teaching” position. Before the recent rise in minimum wage, an independent school teacher had to earn $3,120 per month or $37,440 per year to meet the salary test of section 515.8. Now, however, in order to be classified as exempt, a teacher must earn at least $3,466 per month or $41,600 per year. A teacher earning less than $41,600 annually will not be considered exempt from overtime requirements. Part time teachers must meet the same monthly salary requirement in order to be considered exempt; the salary test is not pro-rated.

    With this in mind, Schools also need to consider recent enactments by numerous cities around California that recently raised their local minimum wage above state level. For example, the minimum wage for the City and County of San Francisco is $12.25 per hour (and scheduled to increase on July 1, 2016) while the minimum wage for the City of Los Angeles will go up to $10.50 beginning July 1, 2016 (for employers with twenty-six or more employees) and will annually rise every year until reaching $15.00 beginning July 1, 2020. Schools located in a municipality that has implemented a local minimum wage above the state $10.00 level must ensure that employees are paid at a minimum of the local hourly minimum wage for all hours worked.

    Importantly, however, while employees must be paid minimum wage pursuant to local ordinances, exempt status for teachers will still be based on California’s state mandated minimum wage. The requirement of Labor Code section 515.8 requires a monthly salary of “two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment.” In other words, section 515.8 does not look to local minimum wage in determining exempt status.

    In light of these new laws, Schools should review the compensation schedules of their employees to ensure compliance with state and local minimum wage requirements. Schools should confirm that all employees are being compensated at a minimum rate of $10.00 per hour for all hours worked. Schools should also review the annual compensation for their exempt teachers and ensure that it meets the new requirement of being compensated at an annual rate of $41,600 per year. If a teacher’s compensation does not meet this threshold, then he or she will not be eligible for “exempt” status.


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by not2cleverRed View Post
    Also, there is nothing wrong with being paid once per month.
    Yeah if the pay comes on time. Which it rarely does. Morals don't seem to exist in business I guess.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    1,937
    You may have very valid points under CA law .....I suggest you play your cards with care as you may well get let go for unexplained reasons once you play them ...me , I'd keep exquisite time records in some safe off premises place

    You need NOT rush to file a wage claim ..for OT , the CA law allows you several years to do so.


+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-02-2013, 04:00 PM
  2. Employer breaking labor laws?
    By LynnLeeAmy in forum Wage & Salary Issues
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-03-2009, 04:30 AM
  3. Employer May Be Violating HIPAA Laws
    By she2003 in forum Health Insurance and HMO Plans
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-29-2008, 01:54 PM
  4. Are our landlords violating DC laws?
    By ll77 in forum Landlord / Tenant Issues
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-25-2007, 01:05 PM
  5. Police violating laws
    By aalfaro in forum Speeding and Other Moving Violations
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-17-2005, 12:50 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

© Since 1995 Advice Company, All Rights Reserved

FreeAdvice® has been providing millions of consumers with outstanding advice, free, since 1995. While not a substitute for personal advice from a licensed professional, it is available AS IS, subject to our Disclaimer and Terms & Conditions Of Use.