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17 year old speeding in Iowa

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Tazabear

New member
Iowa. Our 17 year old was speeding coming home one night. He was going 95 in a 65. Should he hire a lawyer and fight it to get it reduced hopefully or pay it? He has a job which requires driving. This is his 1 offensive. He is worried about loosing it even 30 days.
 


Just Blue

Senior Member
Iowa. Our 17 year old was speeding coming home one night. He was going 95 in a 65. Should he hire a lawyer and fight it to get it reduced hopefully or pay it? He has a job which requires driving. This is his 1 offensive. He is worried about loosing it even 30 days.
Heh...If it were my child I would take away his driving privilege. smh.
 

adjusterjack

Senior Member

TigerD

Senior Member
Iowa. Our 17 year old was speeding coming home one night. He was going 95 in a 65. Should he hire a lawyer and fight it to get it reduced hopefully or pay it? He has a job which requires driving. This is his 1 offensive. He is worried about loosing it even 30 days.
30 days? He is facing a 90 day suspension. You absolutely need a lawyer to get a plea to speeding less than 25 over, which triggers a mandatory suspension.

TD
 

Tazabear

New member
Most of your replies are not very helpful. He was trying to make our curfew for him. He should have left his girlfriend’s earlier or called that he was going to be late. We have life360 and watch his speed often and he usually does really well. Life360 doesn’t say he was going 95 that day but courts likely won’t care. His car also doesn’t have cruise which many of you likely rely on to keep from speeding. He does work on a farm. He works with cows and pigs. Yes he detasseled corn 2 summers in a row. That also takes someone driving him to the pickup spot.
 

commentator

Senior Member
My vote is PAY IT. And make sure it is him who does it. The thing is, I have notice, and the Lord knows I've had a few speeding tickets since I was a young person, the one who goes in with an attorney and tries to "fight" it, when really, they just flat out caught you, it doesn't work as well. Usually they'll give you the benefit of the doubt, IF you don't try to argue with them, fight them, show evidence to the contrary that first time. He needs to concentrate on making sure there is no second time.
 

not2cleverRed

Obvious Observer
Most of your replies are not very helpful. He was trying to make our curfew for him. He should have left his girlfriend’s earlier or called that he was going to be late. We have life360 and watch his speed often and he usually does really well. Life360 doesn’t say he was going 95 that day but courts likely won’t care. His car also doesn’t have cruise which many of you likely rely on to keep from speeding. He does work on a farm. He works with cows and pigs. Yes he detasseled corn 2 summers in a row. That also takes someone driving him to the pickup spot.
Those are excuses. He's old enough and responsible enough to know better.

You can't hold his hand forever. If he faces the consequences of this one, he will have the experience to remind himself in the future that driving safely is more important.

And, as things go, this is a fairly tame one to let him tough it out and learn. You don't want to be like the idiot parent that protested her son's license getting suspended after causing an accident that puts another person in a coma for 3 months, because "I need him to drive himself around."

You don't have to drive him. He is old enough to ask others to drive him around.

I concur with commentator. Going in with the big guns, especially if you are in a rural area, might be off-putting.
Because of your son's age, I would assume that he has already been in a driving/driver safety course. (Otherwise I would suggest such a course.) I suspect that he is more likely to be treated leniently in this situation if he is be able to credibly convey that he is aware of his error and is addressing the cause, so that there will not be a repeat offense.

The no-brainer advice is, when in court, to dress and act respectfully. (<- One would think this is obvious, and I get the sense that you would expect your son to do this.)
 
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