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30 day notice

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J

Jin13

Guest
I live in Michigan and I currently have a month-to-month lease with my current landlord. I found a new apartment more than a month ago, been approved for it, and have been given a move-in date. The moment I found out this date, I gave my current landlord 30 days notice. The day we will move out falls on the 13th of December. When we did not receive any information concerning what a final rent would be, we contacted the office manager. She informed us that they do not pro-rate for move-outs. Thus, they expect us to pay the full amount for the month, even though we will only be here for thirteen days. On top of this, they made no effort to inform us of this when we gave them are thirty day notice that clearly states our move-out date: December 13. The cost of this rent added to the cost of moving in to the new apartment is very expensive for us. If I try to change the date of move-in at the new apartment, I may end up not getting it at all. Moving for my present location is extremely important, since it is way too expensive and the location is in an unsafe neighborhood. Is there anything I can do? What are my options? This is causing me a great deal of additional stress during a time where my attention needs to be focused on finals (I'm a student). A prompt response would be very helpful!
 


HomeGuru

Senior Member
You need to read what your lease agreement states and also check out the State Statutes with respect to terminating a m/m lease.
 
L

LL

Guest
I don't know what Michigan law says about this, but you should check your lease to see if it says anything about about requiring you to terminate at the end of a calendar month.

If you think that the office manager is trying to fool you, send a letter (certified) saying that you think that paying until the thirteenth of the month is appropriate. See what she says. Most unscrupulous landlords are afraid to put what they know is nonsense into writing with their signature.

However, unless you know you are right, it is possible that, if you do not pay for the full month, and on time, if the landlord knows what she is talking about and is right, you could get yourself in some trouble.
 
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