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Appealing Disability Benefits

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Onderzoek

Member
Don't forget that SSI is a low income, means-tested program. If your child is found disabled because of the problems with one hand, your income and resources and your husband's income and resources will factor into payment until your child reaches age 18. Have you already provided proof of your income and resources?

There are many stories of many people who have lived full and complete lives with amputations and don't qualify for disability benefits. But perhaps your son's problems will be considered severe enough to qualify.
 

Ladyback1

Senior Member
What are you hoping to accomplish having him declared disabled @ 3 mo.?

Children are remarkably resilient! What appears as a disability may just be a hitch in the rode that he may be able to overcome as it were.
Will he always have difficulties? Yep, probably so.

Please, please, please be careful what you wish for because it just might come true. I'm afraid that you may be having a knee-jerk reaction.

(FWIW--I have a chronic inflammatory/autoimmune disease that I will always have to take steroids for, will always have to take medication for. This disease impacts my life on a daily basis. I have episodes of weakness in my extremities, I have episodes of tremors/shaking that are not controllable. I battle fatigue after the simplest of tasks. I have pain daily. I continue to work. I continue to do what I need to do to remain an active and contributing member of society. I could qualify for SSDI if I were inclined to do so...)
 

csi7

Senior Member
Disability assessment requires evaluations and with the physical therapist, you may meet the valid medical evidence required for the assessment.

The description of the disability is similar to some individuals whose mothers were given a dangerous drug for nausea in the first three months of pregnancy.

The impact was felt as OP is mentioned as early as birth, three months, and the regular markers used by pediatricians world-wide. The child meets that requirement.

Yes, the disability will affect the child and medical treatment will help the child adjust both physically and mentally.

Once your case has been reviewed, and denied by the second step, the next step is ALJ hearing. It is a matter of having the valid evidence to support the assessment in writing. The people who see the paperwork at the first two levels do NOT see the person. They only see the paperwork.
 

Onderzoek

Member
Be sure to save all your pay stubs, bank statements, rental agreements from now on. As an SSI recipient, income is supposed to be reported every month. Changes in living arrangements and resources are supposed to be reported when they happen - buy or sell a car, a house; buy or sell stock; receive an inheritance or casino jackpot. For minor children, the income and resources of the parent and the spouse of the parent matter for as long as the child is under age 18.

If your child is found disabled because of a deformity in one hand that is currently severely disabling, you would also need to report once the child learns to compensate for the limitations, and he will learn to compensate. There is the story of Pete Gray, the man with one arm who became a minor league baseball player. He learned to compensate. It is highly possible that with the right therapy and practice and modifications, your child could live a thriving life with a deformed hand. Attitude and perseverance will determine how successful he will be. The deformed hand is just a small piece.
 

proud_parent

Senior Member
If your child is found disabled because of a deformity in one hand that is currently severely disabling, you would also need to report once the child learns to compensate for the limitations, and he will learn to compensate.
Quoting this, because I think it's an especially important point.

Children with congenital limb deficiencies do learn to compensate, and often excel, despite their differences.

My daughter was born with symbrachydactyly. She has a partial thumb and no other fingers on her right hand (which would have been her dominant hand). This has presented challenges for her, to be sure. But anyone who has seen her in action would be hard pressed to label her disabled.

There is the story of Pete Gray, the man with one arm who became a minor league baseball player. He learned to compensate.
Jim Abbott was a two-sport athlete in high school, became the first U.S. pitcher to beat Cuba in Cuba in 25 years, threw a complete game en route to an Olympic gold medal, was a 1st round draft pick by the Angels, won his first professional game without playing a single day in the minors, and hurled a no-hitter for the Yankees. All with one hand.

It is highly possible that with the right therapy and practice and modifications, your child could live a thriving life with a deformed hand. Attitude and perseverance will determine how successful he will be. The deformed hand is just a small piece.
Paul Wittgenstein was a rising concert pianist when he was called up into military service during WWI. He took a bullet in the elbow, became a prisoner of war, and lost his right arm to amputation. After the war, he continued his career one handed, playing pieces composed especially for him by the likes of Prokofiev, Strauss, and Ravel.


Best wishes to you and your son, 01ajp2012.
 

Iolite30

New member
Hi, I have to respond to this posting. I am 49 and have syndactyly. I was born with a “normal” thumb on one hand and two “normal” but twisted pinkies. The rest of my fingers are all malformed. On my left hand I have ring and middle fingers with one knuckle each -and my index finger is cut off at halfway, it has one knuckle at the tip and that’s it. On my right hand my ring, middle and infect fingers have on joints and are about the length of a toddlers fingers. All were webbed at birth. I had 15 surgeries by age 13 and I just want to put it out there... people DO adapt. I played the flute growing up and later got a fine arts degree in Metalworking and MADE flutes for a living, actual silver keyed symphony quality flutes. I have had limitations over my life, I could not do chin-ups or monkey bars but know how to knit and can tackle pretty much any craft. I write left handed but cut right handed (as a child I was ambidextrous until each hand developed and claimed its tasks) I can type faster than most people I know including typing this on my phone with one “normal” thumb and one knuckle-less thumb that has a squishy ball of boneless flesh for a tip. I guess that’s a limitation too, I like smaller phones like mine (iPhone SE) because larger screens tend to be harder to reach across with my right thumb (how tragic!). Anyway, what I’m getting at is people adapt... like I said, I’m 49 and I did all my growing and developing through the seventies and eighties without a single day of PT or OT. I hope your baby is doing well (I’ve never responded to a post so I don’t know if you will see this). I just saw this is years old so who knows, I hope your case worked out however you wanted it to.
 

quincy

Senior Member
lolite30, if you have a legal question, please start your own thread.

This thread is from 2012 and belongs to 01ajp2012.

The only one who should add to a thread after this amount of time is the original poster and 01ajp2012 has not been back to the forum since the day this thread was created.
 
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