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Beneficiary changed after death

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ALawyer

Senior Member
One more point -- the life insurance proceeds come in tax free (in about 99.99% of all circumstances) whereas funds from a non-Roth IRA, 401(k) or 403(b) contain "pre-tax" money and when the funds come out of the tax qualified account become taxable to the person receiving the funds.

As to trying to encourage a prosecutor to bring criminal charges against your uncle for forgery or fraud, unfortunately few prosecutors welcome or look forward to handling such cases, and it would cause further disruption in what already seem to be difficult family dynamics.
 

ikillratz

Active Member
One more point -- the life insurance proceeds come in tax free (in about 99.99% of all circumstances) whereas funds from a non-Roth IRA, 401(k) or 403(b) contain "pre-tax" money and when the funds come out of the tax qualified account become taxable to the person receiving the funds.

As to trying to encourage a prosecutor to bring criminal charges against your uncle for forgery or fraud, unfortunately few prosecutors welcome or look forward to handling such cases, and it would cause further disruption in what already seem to be difficult family dynamics.
Why don't prosecutors like fraud cases? This seems pretty open close. My parents have a letter indicating the insurance company determined there was fraud. Once the insurance money is disbursed I see no harm in turning the evidence over. Might be the only way my parents get their lawyer fees back through restitution possibly.
 

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