• FreeAdvice has a new Terms of Service and Privacy Policy, effective May 25, 2018.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our Terms of Service and use of cookies.

Can the IRS Whistleblower report be done via a Attorney/Accountant/agent to keep informant's information somewhat private?

Accident - Bankruptcy - Criminal Law / DUI - Business - Consumer - Employment - Family - Immigration - Real Estate - Tax - Traffic - Wills   Please click a topic or scroll down for more.

Can the IRS Whistleblower report be done via an Attorney/Accountant/agent to keep informant somewhat private?

Is such a thing possible?

Thanks.
 


Sure, but if the source of the information (you) is not disclosed to the IRS that may hinder the ability of the IRS to pursue the matter.
Why would the identify of the informant(me) hinder the ability of the IRS to pursue the matter as long as the information I provide them is correct and can lead to the recovery of the funds?

The IRS could also ask question and get answers via the lawyer/accountant representative. I think the documents will speak for themselves.
 

Taxing Matters

Overtaxed Member
Why would the identify of the informant(me) hinder the ability of the IRS to pursue the matter as long as the information I provide them is correct and can lead to the recovery of the funds?
Because if the IRS needs to use those documents in court it will need to show how the documents were obtained, and that would mean testimony from you to explain that. It may be that the IRS can use what is anonymously and succeed in at least getting a tax adjustment. But it can cause problems in some cases if the person who is providing the information is not known. Again, it is a particular problem in some instances if the IRS needs to go to court. The specific details of the information provided matters a great deal, of course.
 

Zigner

Senior Member, Non-Attorney
Why would the identify of the informant(me) hinder the ability of the IRS to pursue the matter as long as the information I provide them is correct and can lead to the recovery of the funds?

The IRS could also ask question and get answers via the lawyer/accountant representative. I think the documents will speak for themselves.
Are you trying to get a reward?
 

quincy

Senior Member
Of course but I am also trying not to be sued or retaliated against for being a whistleblower especially in the event that the IRS does not want to go after the unpaid tax money.
Reports made in good faith are fairly well insulated from lawsuits and retaliation, whether an investigation finds the report has merit or not.

But nothing can prevent the person/entity you report from pursuing a legal action against you anyway.
 

quincy

Senior Member
The reports are covered by a qualified privilege. It is only when this privilege is not exercised properly that there can be a good basis for a lawsuit.
 

Sponsored Ad

Top