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I know someone who's using their child's ssn for a utility bill.

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quincy

Senior Member
I can think of at least one legitimate reason. As soon as my Young Adult can pay half the mortage and the bills, I'm going to empty nest her. The bills here will have to be put in her name.
Maybe that is what the internet service provider hopes to learn with the phone call - if there is a good reason for two separate internet accounts for the same residence.
 


commentator

Senior Member
I'd bet any amount of money if these jerks won't pay one bill, they won't pay the next one either, and their child will reach his majority finding out that his information/credit has already been serious hijacked. The stuff about "helping his credit" is a crock.
 

TheGeekess

Keeper of the Kraken
The child in question is 8.
I understand that. I doubt the vendor knows the age of the account holder. I was merely giving a legitimate reason why there might be new accounts set up at a given location under another 'first name different, last name the same'.
 

Dandy Don

Senior Member
Is she worried enough to pay what she owes on time? Probably not.

The provider can do credit checks and this is maybe how they discovered there was a discrepancy.
 

gryndor

Member
I'd bet any amount of money if these jerks won't pay one bill, they won't pay the next one either, and their child will reach his majority finding out that his information/credit has already been serious hijacked. The stuff about "helping his credit" is a crock.
If parents ruin their child's credit before they hit the age of majority, is it a process to fix like any other identity theft situation? Or are the parents acting on behalf of their underage child and kiddo is stuck with a black mark? - Just curious.

Or is this one of those "It's an unthinkable and terribly rare situation and there just isn't a path to fix this"
 

quincy

Senior Member
If parents ruin their child's credit before they hit the age of majority, is it a process to fix like any other identity theft situation? Or are the parents acting on behalf of their underage child and kiddo is stuck with a black mark? - Just curious.
The child can sue - through an advocate if still a minor or once s/he turns 18.
 

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